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voodo magik or ethernet cable wiring

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by ship, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    so I wasted like $4.00 but learned an important lesson. Only so many times one can but heads with voodo magik before one learns stuff passable sufficiently. This given it's been a few months since the last time I played with the concept of ethernet cable and I have forgotton all, this much less could care less about color code or mixing up the wires somehow didn't make sense to me tonight and still doesn't but I'll do so in the future.

    Wasted 9 out of a 10 pack of Ethernet crimps but finally got something that worked.

    First I did the 1:1 stuff in thinking that no matter the color, connect them without any crossed wires and all was good. That was bad, half way thru I read the Paladin Tools Lan ProNavigator tester (I bought for work and tried tonight for the first time while home) and reversed pins 4 with 5&6 according to it in hooking up my cable 1:1. Didn't work either in following the tester even after following it's 1&2, 3&6, 4&5, 7&8 tester diagram. Still getting that confounded "split" signal though at some point it did show up as crossed signal - wow what a help.

    Took a moment to look at the configuration for the plugs in the directions for that package and it told me differently than the tester. 1&2, 7&8, 3&6 but 5 than 4 not 4&5 as listed on the tester. In other words, no matter the color it should be pins 5&4 reversed from the above set of pairs.

    Ok, for official sense, it should be stripes first than solids as a concept - neutral than hot as it were in some continued sense. Pin 1 in making no sense for color code... What's pin 1 verses pin 8 always makes this in part crap wiring for me. Also why I didn't do the punch down connections to the
    Wisiwig room. Later I learn perhaps correct or not that it's snap release up in left to right not easier to see snap release down in seeing.
    Anyway, should theoretically be
    1: white/Orange
    2: Orange
    3: white/green
    4: blue
    5: white/blue
    6: green
    7: white/brown
    8: brown

    Theoretically in if two ways possible to wire it, both will work I'm informed tonight, one could reverse the plug as long as pins 3-6 are done respectively that way. In other words, snap release up or down don't matter in wiring unless I expect interconnecting them.

    Followed the guide on the box for plugs and it worked on plugs 10 and 11 tried - even followed the color code this time. It worked.

    Wonder if I can deduct that $4.00 off my taxes as a learning for work type of thing... This much less charge premium time for the hours wasted in training as it were. So now I believe I'm up to doing Ethernet cable at work correctly. This not that I'm willingly going to start doing it without hating doing it.

    Gonna have to draw up a diagram at work for how to wire such things = never going to remember such crap wiring otherwise.
     
  2. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    My cat5 crimp tool has pinouts embossed on it. I don't have it with me so I can't tell you what they are, but I have always followed them and not had any issues.
     
  3. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Keep in mind there are two wiring standards out there, 568A and 568B. B is the defacto standard, which is what you posted. 568A has green and orange reversed. In the "real" (IT) world, very rarely do people make their own patch cables, but they do run jacks and data drops all over the place. You will see patch pannels labled 568A or 568B out there, make sure that you jacks that you buy are labeled the same. I have done office installs with A patch panels and jacks labeled for B, biggest pain ever. After installing about a hundred jacks only 5 were backwards, not to bad in my opinion. Luckly, most manufactures anymore label the jacks with both configs just in case.

    Also, if you wire one connector A and one connector B you get a crossover cable, connect it to two computers and you can communicate without a switch.

    Now the reason for the jumbled up connector is a hold back from the good old days of telecom. The first pair (blue) used to carry line one (used to be red/green), the next pair (green) carried line two (used to be black/yellow). When they added the next pairs they just tied them onto the side. The reason it is left that way is so you can easily patch a telephone from a PBX into a data patch panel and get it working, and if a PC is on the other end you dont have to worry about blowing it up.

    As far as data goes down those lines, a 10bit or 100bit line only uses the green and orange pairs, gigabit or higher uses all 4 pairs.

    Now... I have spent way to much time taking cisco classes and working for communication installers....
     
  4. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Yup, my crimp tool also has it on it... if only I will have consulted the tool instead of just doint it.... don't tell my tax man. Got a Sullstar Tech tool I bought from a supplier, even got a class in the use of it and had it and the stripper alighned for me. Still not X is black, Y is orange and Z is red by way of cable layout and plug config as per a L21-30 outlet per the cable coloring feeding it. But you are correct, the crimp tool confirms not what the tester said but what the package on the plugs said if following schedule A verses
    B. Even if one thought what sense the quick reliece was up verses down on the tool would tell you what's up and down - I did inverted of this and it worked.

    Still as a norm for us barbarians, I would hope that the plugs get marked 1-8 in what wire goes first. This the concept after the crossed wires, of if it's quick disconnect lever up or down. That could matter alot = this even if the chart on the tool tells you and you see that it's quick release up thus you should see 1-8 thru that quick release.
     
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    the greatest IT thing ever invented? The RJ45 that lets you push the wires all the way through the end, crimp it then trim. I've always hated struggling trying to get all the wires lined up, pushed into their respective slots in the connector, then sneezing right before you crimp.
    :rolleyes:
     
  6. Radman

    Radman Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    I always end up doing a quick internet search every time I need to wire network cables, to make sure I get it right.
     
  7. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    Not trying to bash Ship here... but what a classic example of how much time you can waste by not double checking the instructions or at least having a standard procedure that you always follow. I really try to stress having a set routine with my students... part of which should be check the instructions for complicated things you don't do all the time.

    You know what I always do is forget to slide the outside jacket shielding for the plug on the wire before I solder both ends on an audio cable. I can't tell you how many times I've done that... heck one time I did it twice on the same cable... yep soldered it up, discovered that I had forgotten the shielding, removed the plug, soldered it back up... and discovered I had AGAIN forgotten the shielding.
     
  8. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Yea, the whole thing grew out of telecom. The "original" promise of Ethernet was that it could be installed using the existing building wiring of your business telephone system. That is, as long as you were never going to move off of 10 meg, your building had multi-pair cables of at least Cat3, you didn't mind the occasional lightning hit taking out your whole system, all your wiring was done in a "home run" layout, etc! Didn't take long before that idea was left in the trashcan and people were putting separate network cable in anyway! (Could not be avoided if you wanted to move up to 100 meg.) Anyway, as with many things in life, Ethernet became a legacy standard. Two of the pairs became dead (I call that scar tissue!) and color coding was left over from Ma Bell. (Remember, there is actually an international standard for colors and numbers 0 to 9, Black, Br, Red, Org, Yel, Grn, Blue, Violet, etc. which Ma Bell never used.) So, now we have Cat6 and upcoming Cat7 which will actually depart from 3, 4, & 5 by actually making use of the other two pairs in services rated to (and eventually above) 1 Gig. The colors however will remain the same. Ultimately, as long as signals are balanced on pairs and end up on the right pins at the other end, color does not mater. There is still a good reason to maintain the "B" standard on all your network wiring: Expansion! I do a lot of IT work and when you get the call to split a line and send it to 4 new offices, it's nice to be able to just walk in, punch on some new connectors and install a switch without having to figure out what the original installer did!
     
  9. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Most annoying thing EVER. The contractor that I worked for was a really great installer, we pulled a lot of copper, but fiber was our specialty. Can not tell you have many cube re-works we did where the would run one drop to a cube, split it, run 2 pairs to data and another pair to voice. It works, but man it makes huge headaches down the line. Same thing about splitting a cat 5 run into 2 jacks.

    On another note... I did a show awhile back in a space that had a 4 line DMX drop to stage. When I had some issues I pulled the panel and found a single run of cat 5 that each pair had been terminated to a 5 pin XLR, no pin one on anything.
     
  10. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Eeek! DMX works on the difference between pin 2 & 3 BUT only if noise levels do not exceed the rail to rail logic supply! Pin 1 insures that there is some form of common reference for pins 2 & 3 to do their thing. Pin 1 is usually connected to the common of the logic power supply (not the case ground of course) so that 2 & 3 will not exceed available logic voltage levels. Hard to believe that system worked at all !
     
  11. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Well it all goes back to the old quote, "you can run DMX over barb wire, it might work but its not advisable".

    Well, I never even hooked it up, if a I had not seen the cat5 I probably would have used it but luckly I saw the cable so I did not have to spend the hour or so troubleshooting. They claimed it worked, I draped my own cable.
     
  12. STEVETERRY

    STEVETERRY Well-Known Member

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    Errr....It's not "Crap Wiring". Sorry for your 10 connector loss, but there it is.


    There's a good reason that RJ45's are wired that way, and it's not hard to learn.
    And if you're like me and forget, the correct method (TIA568A or B) is available in 100 places online.

    ST
     
  13. Radman

    Radman Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't necessarily call it a good reason, however I would say it is logical. I could get into describing it but really its so much easier to refer you all to wikipedia!
     
  14. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Well...... DMX only requires two wires to operate. The original specs only called for pins 2&3 to be connected. The carrying of any voltage on any other lines is technically outside specs.
     
  15. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Bottom line is that will not work (correctly.) In the real world, DMX is based on the RS485 interface protocol. (Sample ckt http://www.x-light.ru/Image DMX512/dmx-repeater.jpg )

    The inputs to pin 2 & 3 must be between logic ground and logic rail. If they are not, (example: pin 2= +7v pin 3= +8v) BOTH comparators will return a "1" logic. Running DMX without pin one is bad medicine and will result in plenty of headaches!
     

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