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When to change the projector bulb?

Discussion in 'Multimedia, Projection, and Show Control' started by mikefellh, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. mikefellh

    mikefellh Active Member

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    Let's say it's not blown.

    Epson G6900WU with a 6000 lumen bulb.
    It's rated at 2000hours in "normal mode" (vs. 4000 hours in "eco" mode).
    I got 750hours normal, 225 eco.
    I was thinking of waiting until end of May (end of our season) to do it...that would add another another 130hours (over-estimation).

    Figure waiting to half-life (approximately) would be a good time.

    Any reason to change it sooner?

    Mike
     
  2. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    Only reason t change it sooner is if it isn't bright enough. That is generally why I change lamps.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  3. seanandkate

    seanandkate Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I agree with @ruinexplorer . If your starting to see a problematic dip in output, change the lamp. If it's still doing what you need it to do, you're still good to go. If you are estimating that by the end of your season you will have less than 1000 hrs on a lamp rated for 2000, I would think that you are probably still good (again, unless output is an issue). Of course, it never hurts to have your next projector lamp already sitting on a shelf in your venue...
     
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  4. mikefellh

    mikefellh Active Member

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    Problem is I don't know if it has gotten darker than when it was new, because I have nothing to compare it to. It's not like I took a reading of the projection when it was new, and could do another reading now to see if it is darker.
     
  5. seanandkate

    seanandkate Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    It will be somewhat darker. No need to measure. The real question is, is it now too dark for your application? If it's not, don't mess with success. If you want to hedge your bets, order another lamp so if your present one fails, or does become objectionable dim, swap it out. I think I swapped out my last lamp at about 2/3 of the rated life because I needed a boost for a particular application (and truth be known, to my eye, I didn't see that dramatic an increase in output. YMMV.)
     
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  6. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @mikefellh True; Next time you install a new lamp, dutifully clean the optical path then take and record a reading for future reference. Just a thought from a geezer for whom projectors were Carousels projecting 35 mm and super slides.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard
     
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  7. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    Generally speaking, the lamp will start to lose intensity at around 200 hours. Again, generally speaking, you should still have at least half of your original output at the rated end of life. Most likely you will have closer to 60% output at end of life. Obviously there are other factors at play (how many on/off cycles, contamination on the optics, etc.).
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  8. Jay Ashworth

    Jay Ashworth Well-Known Member

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    Here's an excellent use for an Android luminance meter. If you're measuring the same lamp in the same fixture/projector, you don't care if the absolute number is correctly calibrated.

    Pick an app, measure all the relevant things next time you change them (same conditions of lens, zoom, etc), and then you'll have a baseline.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.

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