Where do you put your script?

chausman

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If you use a script, where do you put it in the booth? Like for example, at one place, we have an ETC Express 48/96 and we put the script with all of our cues on the faders. (Sometimes with a small dowel to keep from pushing buttons) At another spot they didn't have space to put the script so I have to hold it or have it on my lap. Where would you put it?
 
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MisterTim

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If you use a script, where do you put it in the booth? Like for example, at one place, we have an ETC Express 48/96 and we put the script with all of our cues on the faders. (Sometimes with a small dowel to keep from pushing buttons) At another spot they didn't have space to put the script so I have to hold it or have it on my lap. Where would you put it?
On a monitor on an arm, because I'm often reading digital scripts. So much easier that way. But if I only have paper, it goes on a music stand (in a binder) next to me, if there's space. If not, then it gets tossed around and never ends up anywhere I want it.
 

cpf

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Music stand, iPad, or laptop+external LCD. I like digital scripts, but writing in them is a no-go (without a tablet PC blah blah) so generally I make a hard copy of the script, mark it up, then transfer the notes onto a word document as comments, which then show up beside the script when it's printed or viewed on-screen. Most of the time I'm stuck with paper, though, and the music people haven't noticed the 2 stands that are missing yet.
 

chausman

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You use an iPad for scripts? That seems a little scary to me. While I do like Apple products, I would be worried about things like battery life or freezing up.
 

cpf

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I've never had issues with Goodreader crashing on PDFs, so therefore it will never happen. Even considering that, I'd say that the vanilla iPad running mature software like GoodReader is even more stable than a full-size PC running Word or Acrobat (meaning that both crash incredibly rarely). And yes, I keep it plugged in with autolock disabled.
 

nd925a

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We also have the etc 48/96 we do the same thing for lights, sound normally doesn't use a script just a page of who's on when...that normally sits on the high mid low nobs on the sound board and gets moved in the rare occation of adjustments during a show
 

Drmafreek

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Our booth has a station for the sound board op, stage manager, and light board op. The only personnel needing a script to run the show is the stage manager. Her or she has an open desk so that they can place their prompt script, as well as a pc in case they'd like to keep a cue list handy running on it. Both the sound board op and the light board op listen for the "G" word to know when to proceed with their next cue.
 

NickVon

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I have a crummy music stand that isn't fit to make an appearance on stage but makes a great script holder for the Audio Position. For the light console, it sits on the Insights bottom fader row, or on the open area of desk to the right. Each of our control positions have 7 foot tables, so i guess we are lucky like that.
 

derekleffew

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chausman

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Agree with Drmafreek, what does a board operator need a script for?
Since in most of the shows I have done, I have been the person designing most of the show as far as lights. Sound usually has two people. One to actually run the board and one who is on headset following in the script. I should mention that the stage manager is on SL with a crew boos on SR. The only cues that we get from the stage manager are when crew is offstage and we are ready to start. Lights usually handles all spot cues.
 

avkid

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Agree with Drmafreek, what does a board operator need a script for?

Which audio console is it (might be Midas?) that has an optional rolling script holder? Anyone have a picture?
Someone sells an aftermarket Script Slide for Digico desks.
 

cpf

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Agree with Drmafreek, what does a board operator need a script for?
Lack of people capable of reading a script and calling cues, so it just falls to the person who has done everything else related with tech, mainly.
 

damjamkato

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At my school, at least in the context of a musical, the sound board operator always follows along with the script, or has memorized their cues. I haven't ever heard of a SM who gave microphone mute/unmute cues to the sound operator (effect cues are usually called). You can't really wear a headset and mix at the same time, so it becomes a necessity to be a self-sufficient operator. I recently shadowed the A1 for the touring production of The Lion King, and he had the entire show memorized in terms of mixing, but still took effect cues from a cue light.

Just my .02
 

DuckJordan

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Doesnt matter
At my school, at least in the context of a musical, the sound board operator always follows along with the script, or has memorized their cues. I haven't ever heard of a SM who gave microphone mute/unmute cues to the sound operator (effect cues are usually called). You can't really wear a headset and mix at the same time, so it becomes a necessity to be a self-sufficient operator. I recently shadowed the A1 for the touring production of The Lion King, and he had the entire show memorized in terms of mixing, but still took effect cues from a cue light.

Just my .02

Sound is really the only area where it gets muddy as far as who handles cue calls, In our space microphone mutes/ mixing is handled by the Board mixer, and sound effect cues are handled by a go click by an op on headset. So we still have stage manager calling all the cues but the mixer for any microphones is on his/her own and is required to know the show.
 

Drmafreek

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At my school, at least in the context of a musical, the sound board operator always follows along with the script, or has memorized their cues. I haven't ever heard of a SM who gave microphone mute/unmute cues to the sound operator (effect cues are usually called). You can't really wear a headset and mix at the same time, so it becomes a necessity to be a self-sufficient operator. I recently shadowed the A1 for the touring production of The Lion King, and he had the entire show memorized in terms of mixing, but still took effect cues from a cue light.

Just my .02
You would be correct on mic mute/unmute cues. The sound board op should be handling that due to mixing the sound live. Though most sound board ops don't need a script for that due to watching the show and learning it fairly well. My sound board ops (always students with little to no experience) generally are given a list of songs and what characters/actors are in each song. Then through the tech process they learn the show and are able to quickly pick up people who come on or off.

Sound cues during a musical are a different beast. My sound board op tosses on his one-ear headset just before the sound cue and then waits for the "Go" and then takes the headset of. Could he do it without the SM calling it? Yes. But, this allows them a bit of experience for non musical shows, listening to the SM and going when told. It's helps that we run QLab and all he has to do is hit a spacebar for the cues.


Since in most of the shows I have done, I have been the person designing most of the show as far as lights. Sound usually has two people. One to actually run the board and one who is on headset following in the script. I should mention that the stage manager is on SL with a crew boos on SR. The only cues that we get from the stage manager are when crew is offstage and we are ready to start. Lights usually handles all spot cues.
Even with a Stage Manager on-stage, then generally call the light cues in the professional world. Now, I'm speaking mostly of theatre. I know some concerts are run by the LD and he/she will often call their own cues. But when it comes down to timing everything together, it's always nicer to have one person calling all the cues together.
 

chausman

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chausman

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Even with a Stage Manager on-stage, then generally call the light cues in the professional world. Now, I'm speaking mostly of theatre. I know some concerts are run by the LD and he/she will often call their own cues. But when it comes down to timing everything together, it's always nicer to have one person calling all the cues together.
I would like to have a stage manager who called cues (Especially since this is a theater arts TRAINING program, but it just doesn't work out that way. And with the theater, we just make it up as we go. The plot can't change except for gels and we don't have time for that. For the shows I have done, it end up being me meeting with the director for about 10 mins going over cues and asking what they want specifically they want. I have worked with one director who actually took time and we went through the entire thing. She told me what she wanted and then I did what I could. Every other director has just giving special points us and it is do difficult to get what we are doing to the stage manager. And when we get 5 hours for 4 nights to rehearse in the space, we are usually still programing and making changes on the last day. (theres a whole other rant about other things that limit what we can do, but this is not the place)

And I should mention that sound does sometimes get cues from the SM. Ut just depends on who is the SM.
 
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derekleffew

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...Who needs who needs to get under there anyway!
No problem "getting under there." The lexan platform has fixed V-groove casters that ride on rails attached to the console, enabling it to easily slide left or right providing access underneath. I can envision some young, enterprising student fabricating something similar for an Express 48/96 or 72/144.
 
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chausman

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No problem "using anything under there." The lexan platform has fixed V-groove casters that ride on rails attached to the console, enabling it to easily slide left or right providing access underneath. I can envision some young, enterprising student fabricating something similar for an Express 48/96 or 72/144.
But I'm not going to!

Things sit rather well on the Express as it is!
 
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WooferHound

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There are many times that there is no place to put my script . . . so it's there in my lap.