Will the HPL disappear?

David Ashton

Well-Known Member
I have been buying theatre lamps from China, they are cheap and so far reliable, with millions of halogen luminaires in the world and the cost of LEDs prohibitive for infrequent users like schools, there is a vacuum in the market which China seems happy to fill. Plus the fact that a halogen is so much better quality light than cheap LEDs and much more reliable and cheap to fix.
 

almorton

Well-Known Member
I have been buying theatre lamps from China, they are cheap and so far reliable, with millions of halogen luminaires in the world and the cost of LEDs prohibitive for infrequent users like schools, there is a vacuum in the market which China seems happy to fill. Plus the fact that a halogen is so much better quality light than cheap LEDs and much more reliable and cheap to fix.
We bought some "off brand" PAR lamps. Very short lived and with some catastrophic failure modes. Just pushed us into replacing with proper theatre grade LED.
 

FMEng

Well-Known Member
Fight Leukemia
We bought some "off brand" PAR lamps. Very short lived and with some catastrophic failure modes. Just pushed us into replacing with proper theatre grade LED.
When GE stopped production, I bought every last PAR56 NSP I could find in any quantity. I must have around three dozen of them. Grainger was the last place to sell them, and they are mine, ALL MINE.
 

David Ashton

Well-Known Member

almorton

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately true (currently, anyway), which means they'll be struck trying to use "domestic" LED eventually, which they'll be unhappy with, but them's the breaks.

We had been using E27 PAR38 screw in lamps in our houselights. They are currently still available while stocks last, but the price is much higher than we used to pay (around 4x). Economics can force your hand. How much are you prepared to pay to continue using the the same lamps?
 
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tjrobb

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately true (currently, anyway), which means they'll be struck trying to use "domestic" LED eventually, which they'll be unhappy with, but them's the breaks.

We had been using E27 PAR38 screw in lamps in our houselights. They are currently still available while stocks last, but the price is much higher than we used to pay (around 4x). Economics can force your hand. How much are you prepared to pay to continue using the the same lamps?
Our LED swap came down to economics and infrequent lamping. Something about a 14' lamp changer pole OR needing to walk on the 100-year-old plaster ceiling makes it not so fun. (I also set off the fire alarm changing a lamp...)
 

DELO72

Well-Known Member
Broken up for ease of reading:
:)-))


[ deep breath ]

And here's where that gets complicated, @DELO72:

That second block appears to be largely the same as the first block (a list of things not General Service Lamps, and hence not restricted from manufacture)... but because of that, it becomes unclear what the "this definition" at the head of the second block applies to.

Or: "huh?"

It really feels like that second block should be exceptions-to-the-exceptions--things which *are* (again) subject to manufacture restriction. Was this somehow just an infelicity of copy-pasta? Am I misreading it?

Or did they miswrite it?
Here's the entire law- enjoy the read. https://www.regulations.gov/document/EERE-2013-BT-STD-0051-0097
 

DELO72

Well-Known Member
I did. And you chose to both ignore them and challenge the validity of my statement. I'm gonna leave the mic here on the stage where I dropped it. I'm done responding to this thread as the statement has already been made and the source material has been posted for your perusal.
 

Jay Ashworth

Well-Known Member
Well, I don't know whose comment that's a response to, Mark, cause it's certainly not a response to mine.

But you do you.
 
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gafftaper

Senior Team
Senior Team
Fight Leukemia
So the key for our industry really is the magic 3,300 lumen line. Just about everything in the professional lighting kit is a lot brighter than that.

With the common exception of things like house lights that were designed to use traditional household lamps.
 

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
I took slightly over two hours today in reading the first link Mark provided. Got reading a little beyond the table in reading and understanding. https://www.regulations.gov/document/EERE-2013-BT-STD-0051-0097 . More reading to do. I bow to you Mark on dealing with such regulations telling you.
GLC in E-26 means no G-9.5 or B-28s or GX-16d are in any way effected - most of the lamps in use. And the oldest stage and studio lamp being the 400G/SP is not officially disconued. This ruling in reading would include the HPL or most other than medium screw PAR lamps. Yet to get to the end of the book... Don't tell us in reading, educating ourselves etc.
400G/SP G.E. #21349 (?disc.) CL, SP. Incd. 400w/115v G-30 c-9 LCL 3" E-26 (Base Down to Horz) 8,400 Lum 200hr. This lamp so far in my readiung in not doing the calculation of wattate/output minimum, still should exist in about 110 yers of production of it. This is the "box spot" and origional Fresnel lamp.
 

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