The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

winamp: Linux?

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by headcrab, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. headcrab

    headcrab Active Member

    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    Is there a player software like Winamp that runs on Linux (Fedora 10)? I want to be able to search the library in the same way that Winamp lets you. Generic software such as comes with Linux won't work since our library is 35000+ tracks.
    Thanks.
     
  2. mbandgeek

    mbandgeek Active Member

    Messages:
    480
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Not sure if it will work on fedora, but i like Banshee. It is a lot like winamp with support for ipods, has a decent search feature, and it also has an album art search feature. It is the best one that i have found. I am running Ubuntu 8.10.
     
  3. Gretsch

    Gretsch Member

    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Logan, Utah, United States
    Try Amarock it should be Fedora friendly. I use it on ubuntu feisty and it works great.
     
  4. headcrab

    headcrab Active Member

    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    Thanks all. But I just discovered that the external hard drive with the library on it is not recognized by the Linux laptop here. Back down to the basement... (dig...dig...)
     
  5. NickJones

    NickJones Active Member

    Messages:
    950
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Somewhere far far away, Vic, Aus
    It should work, was the hard drive previously used in a Windows system as once Windows crashes it locks the hard drive so only a Windows system can acces it unless you force mount it. I can give you the Termainal comands for it if this is your problem. You are using Fedora?
    Nick
     
  6. PhantomD

    PhantomD

    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Didn't realise that anybody still used Winamp!!!!
     
  7. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,810
    Likes Received:
    484
    Location:
    Vegas
    First off PhantomD winamp is a great program, very versatile and customizable. I really hope that you aren't scoffing at Winamp because "iTunes is so much better." This will be the end of my Winamp tirade, if you care to continue this conversation phantom PM me.

    As far as Linux software, I absolutely love Amarok, but 2.0 is having troubles with ipods, so if you want a player to talk to your ipod you have to go to version 1.6. Also it runs KDE, something I also really like. If your Fedora core isn't KDE based you can install the stuff you need but it's over head and size that not all computer users want.

    Another alternative is Rhythmbox. It is a little less powerful than Amarok but it will install on about any Linux distro and it plays quite nicely with ipods and other mobile devices. It also supports a play queue that is separate from the library your looking at which is a feature I quite like in Winamp.

    As far as your hard drive, if it's not working with your linux install it is probably formatted NTFS. Making your linux distro speak NTFS is not terribly difficult, but is not something that distro's generally support out of the box. Look up something like "read NTFS hard drive Fedora 10" on Google or go to your favorite Fedora forum if you have one, and the process will be explained there as it changes slightly from distro to distro.
     
  8. NickJones

    NickJones Active Member

    Messages:
    950
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Somewhere far far away, Vic, Aus
    Ubuntu has NTFS support built in. (Not that I love Ubuntu or anything...) as I said Windows locks NTFS drives, so untill you can read them you will need to force mount.
    All of the software that [user]porkchop[/user] & the others meantioned is great software that will do what you want.

    As for getting your drive read...
    Copy all the Data on the drive you want to keep onto another drive.
    Download BartPE or any simmilar Windows boot disk.
    Burn ISO to disk & boot from it.
    Select your partitioner.
    Format drive to FAT32 if you want it to be read on Linux & Windows or EXT3 if you want it to be read only on Linux systems.
    Copy data back from backup drive.

    There ya go.

    Didn't realise how many CB-ers used Linux. Time to make a Group?

    Nick
     
  9. headcrab

    headcrab Active Member

    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    I can't copy the music to my local hard drive because there is 180GB of music and I have only 20GB of free space. Besides I think FAT32 doesn't support huge files of the type on the HD. Yes I am running Fedora 10, and NickJones, you mentioned console commands?
    I use winamp 5.something at home. Its awesome.
    I found Rhythmbox and it seems to be the Linux equivalent of Winamp. I will check it out more.
     
  10. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    New Haven Area, CT
    I used to absolutely love Exaile when I was a Linux junkie. If you really like winamp, then, granted I dont think it has library support, XMMS is nice. Also, have you tried running Winamp under wine? I'm not sure whether or not it works, but I'd guess that it's probably worth a try.
     
  11. NickJones

    NickJones Active Member

    Messages:
    950
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Somewhere far far away, Vic, Aus
    The Console commands (Terminal/Bash) are to mount a locked NTFS file system. I haven't had much experience with Fedora but if you aren't too settled in and are prepared to make the move to Ubuntu 9.10 (Great OS) then I can help you and tell you how to get it all to work, but, I have no idea about packages and stuff for Fedora.
    Ubuntu guys also send you a free CD with 9.10 on it, so you dont even have to download it, (and it comes rapped in bubble rap so you have somthing to do during the 10 minutes it takes to install. Then you will have all the afforementioned software. And more once you install it from the package manager.
    Nick
     
  12. headcrab

    headcrab Active Member

    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    I can't change the OS of the laptop. I'm stuck with Fedora 10.
    How would I install Winamp under Wine? Could I then access the hard drive through the emulator?
     
  13. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    New Haven Area, CT
    First off, Wine Is Not an Emulator. :grin: That's where the name comes from.
    Second, yes, you can.
     
  14. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,810
    Likes Received:
    484
    Location:
    Vegas
    NickJones, Ubuntu does have NTFS support out of the box (at least since Intrepid, it didn't in Hardy and previous), but not all Linux distros do. Fedora 10 is one of those disros that does not support NTFS formatting out of the box. What you have to do is install "ntfs-3g" apparently the command line installer in Fedora is yum so you have to open the terminal and run the following command (without the quotes) with super user (or root) access:

    "yum install ntfs-3g"

    That will install the necessary drivers to read NTFS formatting. There are several ways to get root access. Because it sounds like you are not an especially experienced Linux user I would suggest adding "sudo " in front of the command so it reads:

    "sudo yum install ntfs-3g"

    Then it will prompt for your administrative password, and allow you to install the program. Alternately your first command in the terminal could be:

    "su -"

    It would ask you for your password and the preceding "sudo" would be unnecessary. The difference is the "su -" gives you root access for the whole terminal session. If you open the terminal to install that program and then close it afterwards it doesn't matter, but if you are going to use the terminal session to do other things then if you use "su -" you are running the risk of modifying things that you don't want modified. This is one of the big security advantages of Linux that it has this root access protection and one of the reasons it is so hard to write viruses and such for. It can be a pain to type "sudo ...." a million times, but it is certainly worth it if you aren't absolutely sure what you are doing.

    As a side note all Fedora specific information came from the Unofficial Fedora FAQ, you might check it out at http://www.fedorafaq.org it looks like a good jumping point.

    One last note, you can always change the OS on any computer, especially if you're talking about Linux. It's just a matter of how much work you want to put into it (mainly in file backup and learning new programs)
     
  15. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,810
    Likes Received:
    484
    Location:
    Vegas
    Wine is great idea, especially for programs that you simply can't find on Linux, but it's still running a totally different OS file system along with your Linux one, that's probably unneeded overhead for a music player, especially since Linux has so many great players available for it. I would seriously look into one of the great Linux alternatives listed here in this thread.
     
  16. headcrab

    headcrab Active Member

    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Northern Colorado
    I talked to our IT guy who said that sometimes drives can't be accessed on Linux if you didn't "safely remove hardware" the last time it was used on Windows. He forced the drive to unmount, remounted it, and now it works properly.
    Rhythmbox player seems to take forever to scan the library, but that might be due to the USB 1.1 ports on this laptop.
     
  17. FixerOfThings

    FixerOfThings Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    The best substitute for Winamp on Linux would be Amarok, in my opinion. I'm currently running it on Debian with a similarly large music library. There are a couple of things to know before starting with it though. First, the 1.4 version is much better than the new 2.x which is just starting to get feature parity with the 1.4.x version (though you may try it also, I gave up when Ubuntu first got it in the repository, and switched to Debian instead). The other thing is that depending on how your disk is formatted you may have some issues. NTFS is kind of slow on linux especially when tagging multiple files at the same time (fixing genres for example). The other thing for large libraries is that the default embedded database type is not great for huge libraries. You can find instructions on how to set it up with MySQL online, which gives much better performance. I have tried other programs, but they just don't seem to scale well for large collections. Then again my computer is kind of old. I don't know how well it works with external drives, but I do know that you should mount the drive BEFORE you start Amarok to avoid having it try to update a "nonexisting" library.
     
  18. waynehoskins

    waynehoskins Active Member

    Messages:
    782
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Arlington, TX
    I'm late jumping in, but here's what I've tried:

    Amarok is nice. It's pretty. It has bells and whistles that I'll never use.

    I use MPD and Sonata at the church. MPD is server, Sonata is an MPD client (there are others). I can run the client and server on separate boxes so I don't have to have multiple consoles up. It's nice for what I need.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice