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wireless headsets

Discussion in 'General Advice' started by goboleko, Sep 4, 2008.

  1. goboleko

    goboleko Member

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    Greeting All!!

    I've been informed that I have about 2k that needs to be spent by mid-October, and I'm thinking about a replacement for my decades old clear-com system. The old system was never a permanent instalation, so I have xlr running here there and everywhere...

    I'm thinking wireless might be the thing. It would be nice to have something flexible enough to use in our black box space which is about 100 yards down the hall from our main auditorium (a proscenium stage with fly system.. 1150 seats)

    Any brand suggestions?... Any systems I should avoid?... Should I stick to a hardwired system? How much should I anticipate spending? Any rechargeable systems? Any systems seem especially appropriate for an educational setting? Whatever?

    Thanks,
    GOKO:mrgreen:

    Thanks for the input
     
  2. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    You will spend at least 4k for a wireless system that will actually work. Do a search, we have beat this one into the ground before.

    I would stay with a hardwired system and pull some cable/put in some conduit. If you power supply still works, keep using it. I have a power supply in stock that I still use that I believe was bought in the 80's. Some clearcom stuff never dies.

    Have a few wireless around is great, but unless you have to have the wireless (ASM, Fly crew, etc), it can be more of a liability then something helpful.
     
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  3. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Most if not all wireless base stations (not including any actual beltpacks or headsets!) are over $2k, so wireless is probably out of the question.
     
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  4. waynehoskins

    waynehoskins Active Member

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    Yep, while the good stuff just works, the cheap stuff just doesn't works. Fragile radio link and all that...

    If you don't have to have a wireless something, then hardwire it. Wireless has every possible failure mode of a wired device, and then a fragile radio link in the middle of it all.

    As far as good names: CC, RTS, HME, Telex, Tech Projects -- in no particular order.
     
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  5. wadeace

    wadeace Member

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    you might want to chech out index
    they make modles that will intergrate with a two wire system (IE clear com).
    i dont have much experience with these systems, however, i am getting my own system and will report back.
     
  6. goboleko

    goboleko Member

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    O.K....

    I'm getting the message that wireless may not be an option...

    What about keeping my clear com base and just going for permanent xlr runs in conduit. I'll need 2 ports in FOH mix for sound and lights.. two ports for spot ops in our elevated tech booth.. ports dsr and dsl for stage management and a port on the fly rail..

    Think I have a chance of having that upgrade made for 2k or less?

    Thanks for the input so far, and I look forward to more

    GOKO
     
  7. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Its possible. Conduit can be expensive to run, but I have a feeling that you could do it pretty easily if you looked around. First and foremost, is there a mic snake or conduit running from your booth to your stage? If so, you could borrow a line for that. That aside, any electrician can come and and run the stuff for you for pretty cheap and VERY fast. I would suggest not doing this yourself, conduit bending is a bit of a black art, after you get it your are quick, but before that you have to re-cut constantly.
     
  8. philhaney

    philhaney CBMod CB Mods

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    Bear in mind that the NEC specifies a maximun number of conductors (wires) that may exist in any given conduit. Also, never run power and low-voltage (audio, comm) wires in the same conduit.

    While there are tricks to bending conduit perfectly every time (which I am not privvy to) there are ways around bending conduit altogether. This page in the McMaster-Carr catalog (scroll down) has metal conduit access ports (also caled condolets or condulets) that you can probably get at your local Home Depot, Lowes, or other hardware/electrical supply store.

    One last piece of advice: Since this is low-voltage communication wire you are running, solder everything! Nothing sucks worse than poor/crackling/cutting-in-and-out comms during a critical part of a performance because of corosion build-up where the wires were twisted together in a junction box somewhere (with or without wire nuts).

    Solder and heat shrink tubing are your friend. ;) :)
     
  9. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Take a look at wiremold products, very quick and easy.
     
  10. Sayen

    Sayen Active Member

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    Please do! There have been several posts about the Eartec gear, but no one seems to have actually used it.
     
  11. cdub260

    cdub260 CBMod CB Mods

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    Assuming I remember correctly, the fill capacity is 40%.

    Phil, this is rigid conduit, which can be very difficult to work with and a bit more expensive than EMT conduit, which, if this is an indoor installation, would probably be a better choice in this instance.

    Only if the NEC says they're your friends. Check your codebook before you settle on a splicing method, and never put a splice in a conduit.

    Again, check your NEC codebook to see if the product you're considering can be used in your venue. Also, Wiremold products are more expensive than EMT conduit and standard junction boxes. Given the $2000 budget, I would think twice about going this route.
     
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  12. philhaney

    philhaney CBMod CB Mods

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    For this application, wiremold would be a nice choice if local code and the NEC allow it. My posting of the conduit access ports was just a suggestion for someone who doesn't want to have to bend conduit. I didn't realise it was for rigid conduit. My electrical installations are so few and far between (and always industrial or commercial) that for bends I either use flex or J-boxes (junction boxes).

    Thanks CW. I heartily agree. I should have specified soldering to the connectors on the wall plates at each end, and any splicing done "in the middle" (I still say solder) should only be done in a junction box that is proper for the application/situation and only if code approvable. Sorry. :(
     

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