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Flyable Paintings

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by Lgurka, Jan 19, 2017.

  1. Lgurka

    Lgurka New Member

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    I need to figure out a way to built a stucture, cheaply, that will be light enough to be hung from a fly system. I plan to paint renditions of Mark Rothko's Seagram Murals on these, for the show I'm currently directing, Red.
    Any thoughts?

    I tried 2 sheets of plywood held together on the back with 2x4s, but I was much too heavy to be flown safely.
     
  2. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I would do it the way the artist did. Stretched fabric (canvas or muslin) over a wooden frame.

    Construction of the frame depends on how large you want the canvas to be. By the time you're done, should be light weight enough that one person can lift it and should be easily supported from 2-3 pieces of wire 1/8" wire rope cable up to structure.
     
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  3. Jay Ashworth

    Jay Ashworth Well-Known Member

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    There aren't enough bits in "a fly system"; expand?
     
  4. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I'd vote for three lines, then if one fails for any reason you've still got two supporting your load rather than a piece swinging sideways like a pendulum.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard.
     
  5. Skervald

    Skervald Active Member

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    Plus one for stretched canvas. I've built frames as large as 10x15' using 1x4 framing with good success. They end up amazingly light for their size. Care must be taken to keep them from twisting and bowing but it can be done. Paint the individual pieces on all sides to keep the members from warping and make sure to support the long spans so they don't bow under the pressure of the canvas. It takes a few sets of hands to stretch the canvas but it's not bad. Bill Raoul's "Stock Scenery Construction Handbook" is a great resource. Assuming the flats are properly secured to the battens of a fly system that is in good repair and is being run by qualified operators following established safety protocols, you should have no problem. (did I cover all the bases there?)
     
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  6. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Active Member

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    Confused, what was the issue with flying 2 sheets of ply? This initial idea seems way faster/easier than building a broadway flat.
     
  7. Ford

    Ford Sr Product Manager, Chauvet Professional

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    What do you mean "too heavy to be flown safely"? If your arbors are properly counterweighted, it shouldn't be an issue.
    What are you planning in terms of attaching the structure to your battens?

    In retrospect... I see that I'm making assumptions about your show.
    Can you describe your facilities a little more?
    Is it a theater, or a multi-purpose space, or some other performance venue?
    Does the space have a fly system, or are you trying to create the whole thing?
    Are you using a counterweight fly system, or one of those Crank-style systems I've seen in some schools, or something else entirely?

    These answers should be enough for us to give you some more useful advice.
     
  8. venuetech

    venuetech Well-Known Member

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    I would use hanging irons through bolted to the plywood. The load is normally supported on the bottom iron that is sort of a Jshape.
     

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