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power tool question

Discussion in 'Question of the Day' started by ship, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Your saw seems to be bogging down in a cross cut of 3/4" plywood not just in a spot but over the entire cut. Enough power and voltage drop is not an issue. Wood is also dry and blade is sharp.

    What might be the cause or the first easy thing to look at?

    What is the second thing to check given the lumber is without problems?
     
  2. soundman

    soundman Well-Known Member

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    could it be the guide was set at a slight angle preventing the wood from pass between the far edge of the guide and the blade guard?
     
  3. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    (assuming this is a hand circular saw)

    The line on your wood isn't as straight as you thought it was, so its binding the blade.

    The line you are cutting is directly over the 2x4/saw-horse board that is supporting the plywood and you are cutting into another inch or so of wood.

    You have supported the plywood on the floor with 2x4s, but you set your saw cut depth too deep and you are cutting the linoleum floor....



    Joe
     
  4. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Re-read the question on both binding issues. On the fence, that's possible but possibly not the primary answer or solution. Could be a secondary cause. Always check the simple first, and it's something you should check before using the saw.
     
  5. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    I check that the blade angle is at 90 degrees (or whatever angle I want to cut). I check that the depth of cut is deep enough for the wood. I check that I've got the wood supported and braced if needed, so that it doesn't move when I push the saw. I move and check the cord so that its behind me and trailing and that there's enough slack to complete the cut. Goggles. Occasionally I check that the blade is tight. I suppose a loose blade could wobble and bind? Maybe the blade guard is dragging against the trailing edge of the cut edge as the piece being cut sags down?

    Joe
     
  6. sound_nerd

    sound_nerd Active Member

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    Are you pushing too fast?
     
  7. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Pushing too fast could very much be a factor no matter how many teeth you have in your mouth or how much plaque has built up on them.

    Speaking of no matter how many teeth you have and plaque, that was also a hint.
     
  8. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    And a very subtle one too ship!!
     
  9. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    Your blade is not meant for what you're cutting?
    Solution:replace with appropriate blade.
     
  10. Radman

    Radman Well-Known Member

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    I can just imagine: a newbie using a masonry blade to cut wood.
     
  11. falcon

    falcon Active Member

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    if a saw balde is bogging down, chances are your depth of cut is too great or the blade isn't going all the way through the wood. This cause more friction upon the blade and can cause it to bog down. Another thing that might happen is the gullies in the blade get jammed with wood. This happens to us constantly when we cut sills. When they are filled with wood, the chippings from the blade doesn't have anywhere to go and the blade ends up cutting the chips as well as the plywood. Be sure to check the first one, cause if the blade is too high, it does become a danger to your saftely as I was well aware of a couple of months ago when I got hit by the blade.
     

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