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Color temperature of kerosene flame

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by gafftapegreenia, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    What is the Kelvin color temperature of a kerosene flame as it would be in a Dietz type cold blast lantern?

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  2. venuetech

    venuetech Active Member

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    It would be very similar to a common candle flame
  3. LXPlot

    LXPlot Active Member

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    I found some specs of similar products listing at 3000-4500K/6000K, but I'm not sure how much that helps.
  4. chausman

    chausman Chase

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    Can we ask why? and wait for derek to find the answer :)
  5. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Why, to simulate the feel of kerosene light of course. Can't go using real kerosene on stage now can we?
  6. meatpopsicle

    meatpopsicle Active Member

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    I would think Kerosene flame would be warmer than 3000K. somewhere in the 2500-2700k range. and you might add a touch of red or ruddy orange. Perception is reality.
  7. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    The color temp is only one factor in duplicating the flame. A bigger factor has to do with the distribution of light from the spectrum of the flame. There is a sharp blue cut-off in the flame.

    For example, what is the color temperature of a red LED? There is none, as the LED only puts out a point spectrum.

    Whenever a tight spectrum light source comes into play, duplicating it become an art more than a science. You will probably have to err on the side of amber to get the effect you want.

    A better approach might be to use a high wattage lamp at a low dimmer setting. As the incandescence of the filament drops off, the spectrum not only shifts, it contracts in visible width, much like a flame.
  8. LXPlot

    LXPlot Active Member

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    And you get a warmer feel that might help with a flame.
  9. shiben

    shiben Well-Known Member

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    I would just say something warm. I like using 1k fresnels at low intensities for all kinds of flame effects. now, if its supposed to be flickering, you can drop in a filmFX reel or gobo rotators, and either drop an extremely light frost or run the lens tube to make it more of a flicker. this tends to work well for me
  10. CrazyTechie

    CrazyTechie Member

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    From Google knol, bold is done by me.


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