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Best way to build a tall, climbable rolling unit?

Discussion in 'General Advice' started by vdonahue, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. vdonahue

    vdonahue Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I'm looking to build a large rolling unit for actors to climb on/walk thru, etc...

    This is my second time designing for this show, and the first time I used some standard scaffolding and covered it on all sides. It worked ok, but it was loud, squeaky, clunky, etc...

    I'd like to build one from scratch...so basically I'm looking for ideas about how to build it from scratch, make it stable, and keep it's functionality.

    I need to have two doors, it needs to be tall, it needs to be climbable, and people need to be able to stand on top. It needs to roll, the wheels need to be easily lockable. It's a tall order... just looking for ideas. Check out the picture below. Thanks!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Interesting peice. WHat's the Footprint? Are Air Casters a viability? To me it's really about you, as a designer giving me a picture of what you want, what it needs to do, in what area, Then as a TD I figure out How to frame it, What to use, and how works.
     
  3. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    It makes the most sense to me to take your standard scaffolding approach and look at how you can modify it to make it sturdier and get rid of the squeaks. Perhaps weld all the seams, add more cross bracing, Add a layer of 1/2" plywood on top of the standard decking (which you could bolt or weld in place) to make the platforms more stable.

    Especially if you already own the scaffold equipment... I say play Pimp my Scaffold!
     
  4. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Your going to have to go steel if you want the thing to actually be completly stable.

    http://vansandtdesigns.com/wordpress/?page_id=30

    (the sites not done yet...)

    As far as locking casters go, what we did on a few different shows I did this summer was use pneumatic pistons as breaks. They drop quick and hold strong. You can see them on a few pictures above. Let me know if you need any more info on that.
     
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Good approach, However, as soon as you weld on that scaffold you have destroyed any safety rating it has. On that subject. if you do weld it be sure to pay particular attention to you heat settings as Depth of penetration and burn through will greatly affect your new solid scaffold safety. Of you you must also be sure to remove all the paint, inside and outside the tub in the areas you wish to weld. this is not just an inhalant issue it also affects the quality of the weld. Don't do as I recently saw some guys doing, and attempt to burn the paint off as you go. :rolleyes:
     
  6. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    There is also the problem that some scaffolds are zinc coated, not a fun thing or safe thing to weld to.
     

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