Double-Hang Scrim Procedures

hutc6407

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Jan 20, 2013
Location
Baltimore, MD
Hi all, hopefully this is a simple answer to this question, here's the scenario.

I am the lighting designer for a production of Thoroughly Modern Millie, and we are using a Black Sharktooth Scrim for a decent portion of the production. Of course, there is not enough space to fly out a full 20' tall drop because of the venue. We have two battens next to each other and ideally would like to double-hang the scrim there. I am not completely sure on how to do this, but definitely have an idea on how it should be done (hopefully its the appropriate way too). Here's my thoughts - any help and advice on how to do this would be fantastic.

- Hang the scrim on the downstage batten
- Insert Schedule 40 pipe into the pipe pocket
- Run aircraft cable through the side cable hems
- Attach aircraft cable to bottom pipe and the upstage batten while scrim is at full "in" trim height

This way both battens can fly out or in simultaneously (i.e. when the scrim comes in the downstage batten flys to spike mark, then the upstage batten flies in to its spike which puts the bottom of the scrim down to the stage floor) Ideally this is what I've seen before, however I am unsure if it is appropriate and/or what rigging equipment I need.

thanks a lot!
 

hutc6407

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Jan 20, 2013
Location
Baltimore, MD
The scrim itself is 20'H by 50'W, and if I run with standard pick points wouldn't that be seen once the scrim is lit? And from the stage floor to the top of the fly house it is only about 35', might even be closer to 30'. That's the reason why we can't fly a full drop out without sightline issues...
 

danTt

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Aug 24, 2011
Location
Upstate NY
Well, the trip batten is going to need to be in sight lines for it to actually "trip" anything, and that will have four(ish) pick points of its own, along with the large batten itself, so worrying about the standard pick lines seems unnecessary.
 

BillConnerFASTC

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Jan 30, 2010
Location
Clayton NY 13624
So, at least 4 picks on the bottom, but lets say high trim is 30', so you raise the primary set from 20 to 30', and you have to raise the bottom batten from the floor to 30', and not sure if you have that much travel. High trim and travel - they define a system.

So rig your own trip lines from the upsatge pipe and live with 3 or 4 or 5 lines visible of maybe 1/16" (or 3/16" I see) wire rope and pulleys, etc., and a way to lift those 30' - probably a double purchased clew..

Or make a roll drop with 10 or 12" irrigation pipe.
 

MPowers

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Jan 11, 2010
Location
Des Moines, Iowa

hutc6407

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Joined
Jan 20, 2013
Location
Baltimore, MD
We have our Main Rag border (unfortunately fixed at a height of 15') then a border set at 14'-6" (we could go to 15 too) which is the border that is about 1' directly downstage of the battens where the scrim needs to be placed. If the roll drop seems more practical, how do we do that? I have never encountered one of those before (and we're looking for some of these transitions to be fast - I don't know how fast a roll drop can be). Hope that helps?
 

JChenault

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Jan 5, 2009
Location
seattle, wa USA
It sounds to me like you need to take some precise measurements. Can the upstage batten go all the way to the deck. What is the vertical travel of the deck. How high does the drop need to hang in the out position to not be seen - ie what are the sight lines. Once you have this, you can know if this is even possible.

In truth tripping drops work better with opaque drops, not scrims.

Have you considered a one way traveler track? I have seen this method effectively used for scrims in low ceiling spaces.
 

BillConnerFASTC

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Jan 30, 2010
Location
Clayton NY 13624
I thought about track - certainly easiest, cheapest, safest - but you live with a chain in teh bottom pocket instead of a pipe and loose that taut stretched quality that I like for scrims.

I think tripping bottom is likely to be most satisfactory but it will require some materails and rigging experience and will require the lift lines to be in sight - albeit 1/16" black wire rope isn't much.

Roll drop is nice because it will be a useful investmenty over time but the 10-14" roller will always be in sight - on the floor - and probably represents a longer lead time for the pipe than any other solution. Does commit the scrim to being on a roller - IE bottom hem battened to the roller or somehow attached.

A copy of Lounsberry's "Backstage A-Z" would be a big help.
 

kicknargel

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Aug 10, 2009
Location
Denver, CO
While it might be a good solution, any roll drop, top roll or bottom roll (oleo) is a pretty big construction/rigging project, requiring professionals. And you'll be in 4 figures for materials for sure.

If your grid is at 35', and your borders at 14'-6", you may be able to make it work without any kind of trip, etc. Trouble is your goods are too tall. You could either cut and re-sew the scrim to the minimum usable height, or find way to roll/fold/bunch up the top and sandwich/clamp it between two boards, and attach that to the system pipe.

If I said "start by making a section drawing," would you know how to do that? If not, ask and we'll explain.
 

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