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Options for Multi-Outlet AC Power Cords

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by Stevens R. Miller, Nov 9, 2017.

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  1. JohnD

    JohnD Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Standby-----Repost----Image----plug strip w/camlocks----3-2-1.........
     
  2. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    I wish, but I've never seen anything like that here in the US. Too bad actually, I can certainly see the advantage.
     
  3. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @Lyle Williams How many would you stack plugged into each other? I'm not so much questioning the total load, especially in your higher voltage country, moreso the mechanical integrity / stability and electrical reliability?
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard (From one of the colonies)
     
  4. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @JohnD When it gets here, will it have a three pole power switch with at least three neon lights inside the actuator? What I really loved about the image that last time it was posted was the reverse sex Cams on the neutral and ground AND the pass-through cams for daisy-chaining additional three phase power strips. It was all just too funny.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard.
     
  5. JohnD

    JohnD Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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  6. YesItWillWork

    YesItWillWork Member

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    I find it depends what you are doing with them.

    Plugging into a wall outlet - I generally try and avoid more than two tapons, maybe three at a push but unlikely if they are particularly show critical things.
    Connecting fixtures on a truss together where the connection will be taped and thus supported - I'm generally ok with to around 5 (I'm trying to imagine a situation in my head as I've never really counted, just have a feel for what seems ok). Beyond that I'd run a second power lead and start a second 'tapon tower' as we call them.
     
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  7. STEVETERRY

    STEVETERRY Well-Known Member

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    The voltage rating difference between S and SJ cable type is somewhat irrelevant for entertainment industry applications in North America. Typically, there are no entertainment industry branch circuits above 208V that are serviced by portable cable. The S vs. SJ discussion still centers on resistance to physical abuse.

    ST
     
  8. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    There is, but while yours have 2m, ours have 0.5m (more like 0.25m) at best.
    [​IMG]
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0009K6WJY/?tag=controlbooth-20

    Can't say specifically about the one above, but other Ziotek Liberator® products are 18g SJT.

    Oh OK, if you insist.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    If you're connecting to cord socket, then you can lay them on the ground and stack a few together without mechanical issues, likewise in the back of a rack you can get a stack going and tie it off to either the bottom or side to provide mechanical protection and strain relief. I've seen stacks up to 15 or so in this arrangement, with a total power draw that was probably still only 300 watts across the lot...
     
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  10. Lyle Williams

    Lyle Williams Member

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    No more than 4-5 probably. Most of my piggy-to-iec are 50cm.
     
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  11. TimMc

    TimMc Active Member

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    It's relevant because we were discussing the differences between types, and part of higher allowed voltage is directly related to the physical robustness of the cable. Full circle, so to speak.
     
  12. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    Except that as ST stated and as the voltage used never gets over 208, voltage ratings of the cables being 300 or 600 has no bearing on why the different cables are used and where. It's really all about the jacket design.
     
  13. TimMc

    TimMc Active Member

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    Really? I watched a whole bunch of 480v 3phase delta get hooked up about 5 hours ago... grid/truss automation on the Foo Fighters concert. Ditto for automation on Disney Theatrical tours...

    While not the main focus of this particular discussion, operating voltage IS a criteria and that rating is directly related to both materials choices and the application (thickness, mostly) of those materials.
     
  14. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    My mistake was in stating Never (smacks self on head).

    ST I think used a qualifier, smart guy that he is

    You are correct that for the Foo Fighter application they obviously needed to pay attention to the voltage rating. They are also using other then single conductor cable so used cable appropriate to the application (we assume),

    For the OP who was asking about 120v distribution, the important factor isn’t voltage but durability of the jacket.
     
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  15. TimMc

    TimMc Active Member

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    There's been a long history of various voltages and services used in theater; IIRC there were direct current services in use (and Con Ed provided d.c. power until rather recently). Higher voltages to allow use of smaller, lighter conductors, etc.

    I think it's really been in the last 50-60 years that most of the stuff we use has settled to 120/208v services.

    Stage automation benefits from the smaller conductor cabling (size, weight, smaller motors) and while most of us commoners won't directly handle their services or gear we need to be aware of how they do their jobs.

    Durability *is* important and on that I'm pretty sure we all agree. Too many theaters and producing companies don't have a rigorous and dedicated maintenance person (or that person doesn't have much of a budget) so things that keep working and resist damage are preferable and, in the case of electrical cables, required by Code.
     
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  16. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    I think we get out of the habit about thinking about mundane things like why there's a voltage rating on the cable.

    Part of this is we rarely, if ever, see (in the States) anything but 120/208 or maybe the occasional 240 if the building is small and got a residential supply.

    I've only once in my career seen anything other than those voltages, having had Aggreko do an one-off ice floor install, where their compressors used 400 something volts. We didn't have it so they dropped a transformer on the street and tapped the vault from Con-Ed. I stayed away from that one.
     

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