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A scene shop pounce wheel

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by ship, Dec 21, 2003.

  1. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Darn am I rusty at carpentry. Anyway, I was in the wood shop today making a drawing table as a X-Mass present for my Nice. (I was not about to give up either of my very expensive Hamilton drawing or drafting tables for her so it’s the least I could do.) My, and oh my am I rusty at building furniture that’s other than made from available materials. Just a few years back it will have taken half the time and been much nicer. In any case, it’s amazing what a lot of sanding will do for your end product so it won’t turn out too bad given some shortcomings in materials used. Too bad all I could get was 3/4" BC plywood, 7-layer AC fir will have been much cleaner to work with. (Yea it’s all the materials used, that’s the excuse and I’m sticking by it.)

    But onto the subject of the post. The legs had to have their design transferred from paper to plywood and I did not have a pounce wheel or carbon paper. Found a solution tonight, if you have a laminate cutting saw blade - one of them with teeth about 1/8" or less apart, it makes a good pounce wheel as you roll it along the paper. Just a thought/tip that might come in handy. It works well and I finally have had a use for the thing. A really good pounce wheel would be something in the 5.5/8" to 3.3/8" cordless saw variety if they sell laminate blades for them. Attach a handle to the blade and away you go with something that will stand up to shop use. That's given you don't make one out of a task necessitated pizza cutter.
     
  2. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    I have used an overhead projector with great effect to transfer designs from paper onto the material I am using. One tip is to use a scale drawing and then mark out your boundaries on the material. This then allows you to adjust the position of the projector to ensure that your design fits the size that you want.
    Hope this is helpful.
     

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