Another - no. 4 of 6 currently in Mississippi

Discussion in 'Stage Management and Facility Operations' started by BillConnerFASTC, Aug 9, 2019.

  1. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,530
    Likes Received:
    2,597
    Occupation:
    Theatre Consultant
    Location:
    Clayton NY 13624
    StradivariusBone and Van like this.
  2. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,196
    Likes Received:
    1,647
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    It's weird to see the inside all excavated and poured before the walls and decking are on. Guess maybe that's mostly a PNW thing?
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  3. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,530
    Likes Received:
    2,597
    Occupation:
    Theatre Consultant
    Location:
    Clayton NY 13624
    I agree. I'm much more accustomed to seeing sloped floor poured at end. This one https://www.controlbooth.com/threads/a-new-hs-theatre-under-construction.44817/ had balcony and overhead finished and painted before they poured the main floor.

    Was a pain with early floor because they needed junction box layout for aisle lights - a treacherous issue no matter when in construction - very early.

    Then the one down the road that had 80' stage complete with roof deck and channel grid in place, and now spiral stairs, but hardly footings placed for 1200 seat auditorium.

    I think the sequencing and staging of these is fascinating, and influenced by so many factors, from trees, access, existing buildings, other work in the area (meaning availability of masons usually - a difficult issue these days), floor finishes (I don't know if this one is sealed concrete floor but it will be scarred if it is) and the whim and experience or lack thereof on the superintendents part.
     
    RonHebbard and Van like this.
  4. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,196
    Likes Received:
    1,647
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    One of my currents in Sherwood Oregon:

    20190710_091952.jpg 20190710_081951.jpg
    FOH and onstage.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  5. Amiers

    Amiers Renting to Corporate One Fixture at a Time.

    Messages:
    3,211
    Likes Received:
    1,305
    Occupation:
    Lighting Floor Tech
    Location:
    Phoenix, Az
    Seeing this stuff always makes me interested in wanting to be apart of it.

    Yet the work and schooling that goes into designing and consulting is just out of my scope.

    Forever a hands on guy.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  6. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,196
    Likes Received:
    1,647
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    Actually this is why I'm enjoying what I'm doing right now. Getting to discuss layouts and tweak little things here and there AND getting to interface with the GC's and EC's who have never built a theatre before... I's kind of fun. except when it's not.
     
    TheaterEd and RonHebbard like this.
  7. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,530
    Likes Received:
    2,597
    Occupation:
    Theatre Consultant
    Location:
    Clayton NY 13624
    I guess since I'm retiring I can be a little more candid. As far as schooling, specialized in lighting but took set and costume design courses. I did take Izenour's classes but those were far from how to be a consultant. So, forget the schooling.

    Like so many things, it's a lot client management. Like promising to make a deadline, knowing you won't, and making the client feel good and happy when you do deliver the drawings well past the deadline. It's a learned essential skill.

    A lot is learning how the construction process works - the delivery of the building and the chain of command and floow of paper (or e-docs today) Just the whole process took me 5 years or so to figure out, and I'm still struggling with the electronic methods.

    Figuring out what the users want and need and reconciling with budget is probably the biggest design challenge. After that, if you can draft, copy what others have done at first. And stay focused on the end product.

    Most of all, I early on adopted the "owners best interest" as the guiding principle. When I get stuck, that is what I ask myself.

    And just look and listen and watch.

    Probably a few other lessons to learn but honestly, you could be surprised.

    As often as I have thought about doing something else, like selling theatre stuff, I've never gotten too serious about changing. (If I could have changed to being a forest ranger, I might have done that.).
     
    StradivariusBone likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice