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Cardboard boxes don't work for machines!

Discussion in 'Safety' started by frozenozzie, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. frozenozzie

    frozenozzie Member

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    In our children's Show/workshop produciton of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, we had the idea to make the machines in the candy-creating room our of cardboard boxes and an assortment of items from our props loft as a teamwork building activity among the cast. Well, the assembly wasn't the greatest, since it was a time challenge, so the box-machines didn't hold up well when slid on and off stage. Especially since they had to have moving parts... which essentially stopped moving by our official show date.

    Needless to say, duct tape, boxes, scraps of fabric and random props don't hold up well despite who puts them all together...
     
  2. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    You obviously did not use enough duct tape.
     
    bobgaggle likes this.
  3. frozenozzie

    frozenozzie Member

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    We were suffering from a severe shortage at the time. Only two rolls to go around.
     
  4. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    A tragedy indeed!

    Too poor for gaff?
     
  5. frozenozzie

    frozenozzie Member

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    Yes, that and forgetful. And clumsy. About halfway through we misplaced one of our rolls.

    But poor is the curse of high school theatre, I've discovered from a lack of half-decent wood and no tape!
     
  6. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    I can only imagine what your lights are like.

    At least you're creative with what you have.
     
  7. frozenozzie

    frozenozzie Member

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    That's where most of our money went at one point. That and sound. We got a new sound system a couple years ago, so that's the big thing along with the new lights board.

    Set kind of gets thrown to the wind, though. But yeah, creativity is, um, supported.
     
  8. Spikesgirl

    Spikesgirl Active Member

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    Ooo, frozenozzie - you must be at my old theater. It seems like 90% of our budget went for lights, then sound, then whatever was left went into the shop for new tools and the like. I pleaded, begged, threatened for new saw (ours were over 30 years old) and a vent system for the saw dust - no money, no money, no money. After I left, the TD(also our LD and SD) had to take over running the shop and guess what? Yup, brand new saws, a state-of-the-art vent system and lots of new bells and whistles. Guess I should have quit years before...

    Actually, cardboard can be your friend, but only under certain circumstances. Gaff is better (but more expensive) than duct (more colors), but when we did "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," we had all the students bring in non perishable garbage, cans, bottles, etc, and we used it to decorate the machines. They were made of either hard flats or platforms or both. For anything that's going to get that sort of traffic, you need to use something other than cardboard - not that it was your choice in the first place. At least you gave it your best shot and that's all anyone can expect from you. Always try to do your best, even if the result isn't the best.

    Char5lie

    P.S. wait until they ask you to make a set out of breakfast cereal and chips - yes, I have...
     
  9. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    I must know more.
     
  10. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    4000 test tubes.
     
  11. Spikesgirl

    Spikesgirl Active Member

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    We were doing a production of "La Mancha" and the entire set was 'decorated' with a concotion of Frosted Flakes, Cheerios, corn chips and spackling compound. We smeared about 150 pounds of that crap on every surface. It ws pretty ugly, but after it was painted, it was rather effective.

    We did have fun making skulls out of wig heads and carving masoleum fronts out of sheets of styrofoam. Definitely the highpoints of the show...

    The TD/Set Designer brought in ten hay bales and broke them on stage, so that everything was covered in hay - want to guess what all that hay did to the singers' voices? And the instruments in the pit? We spent two more days clearing all the hay from the stage after the director had a massive blow up with the TD. It was the best of times; it was the worst of times...

    Char5lie
     
  12. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    Kind of off topic, but in regards to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory....

    Can it be done well by a high school? My director is considering producing it next year and I'm a little skeptical. It seems like too rich and full a show to do it well on a high school budget. How did your's turn out?
     
  13. Spikesgirl

    Spikesgirl Active Member

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    Aaron - we did this for our Children's Theater twice and it would really depend upon how much leeway your director will give you for set design and which script you end up using. You can fragment the set (all of Charlie's house was represented by the grandparent's bed and a clothes line, but you still have to deal with such iconic pieces as the glass elevator (we used our Genie lift). Before you panic though, I would check out the script, because I know there are high school version of this.
     
  14. bdkdesigns

    bdkdesigns Active Member Fight Leukemia

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    Cardboard has become our friend this semester. It really is amazing what you can build out of it. We used it for some facing, frames, and two set pieces in Gypsy this year (train and hay stacks). With the proper support, it can take a lot of abuse.

    It's not a quick process since you have to wait for the glue to set, however it is dirt cheap and extremely light yet heavy duty. For instance the hay stack received a plaster and twine treatment. It became so heavy from the plaster that we had to put handles on the back of it and it held up just fine and was easily handled by the actors.
     
  15. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    The next step up from cardboard is FoamCore, used extensively in the display industry. Significantly more expensive, but generally results in a better product. Try also Honeycomb Board.
     
  16. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    I would just like to point out that the "Card Board" most of you are referring to is known, in the industry, as "Corrugated Paper Board" or "Corrugated Fiber Board".
    Derek, I cannot believe your campaign for typographical and grammatical perfection would allow you participate in such a travesty.


    Just as an aside or perhaps a postscript I have a book ,somewhere, from the '70's that is all about making furniture and furnishings from cardboard and recycled materials. If I can find it I'll post a link or scan some pages, for as hokey as it was, they did have some excellent construction techniques and I especially enjoyed the cool speaker array and hanging lamp that was manufactured from recycled styrofoam cups.
     
  17. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Meh. Cardboard is cardboard, I only use it for shipping items. (Redneck Roadcase)

    My carpenter friend has that book! So very kitchy!

    See also this site.

    Remember the TV commercial featuring a Rolls-Royce driving up a ramp of "Corrugated Paper Board"? I think it was sponsored by the Corrugated Cardboard Council or some similar organization.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2008
  18. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    My Father Used to bring home all sorts of cool paper products when he worked for Kimberly Clark and Olin Mills. I remember once he brought home a thing about the size of a brick, it had a peice of "cardboard" for each face and when you pull it apart the iside of the brick was all honey combed paper. Well you could stretch this thing out to some like 5 or 6 feet place it on a hard surface then walk across it. It really was amazing seeing as how the honeycombed stuff was just regular old brown paper material.
     
  19. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    Another awesome and versatile product is coroplast. It's corrugated plastic.
     
  20. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    That's just plastic cardboard. Being PVC, I suspect it's difficult to paint. What scenic uses have you found for it?
     

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