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eq'ing and mixing

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by seanb, Nov 21, 2003.

  1. seanb

    seanb Member

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    hey hey! I've been working hard on my sound stuff, and just finished the Sound Reinforcement Handbook. I'm trying to get moved into mixing now, from sitting down at a fully patched board into making a good sound. I'm pretty good at working with voices (I'm a singer) and I know basically how to use the strip EQ to find the best possible voice quality. I've worked with reverb and compressors.

    I'm looking for the same sort of information for other instruments. What is the next book I ought to be reading? Are there any really solid websites that have mic techniques for different instruments (yeah yeah, 6", play around) and different mics (basic, common live mics)? Especially the input EQ stuff, I've got a pretty good music ear and can learn it, I just need to get started!

    For example, how to get a good warm, punchy acoustic guitar!

    Thanks everyone! I love this forum!
     
  2. cruiser

    cruiser Active Member

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    Id be interested in reading some websites like that too...

    I have some stuff that ive written down that might help you.. in some weird shape or form, i spose they have served me pretty well :p

    USEFUL EQ FREQUENCIES:

    Drum EQ Frequencies:

     BOOST At 80Hz to add weight to Kick Drums and Low Toms.
     BOOST At 120-150Hz to add punch to Toms and Snares.
     BOOST At 6kHz to add sizzle to Cymbals.
     BOOST At 2-3kHz to add definition to a Snare Drum.

     CUT At 150-250Hz to reduce boxiness.
     CUT At 1kHz to reduce Harshness.


    Electric Guitar EQ Frequencies:

     BOOST At 120Hz to add punch to the sound of Rock Guitars.
     BOOST At 2-3kHz to add bite.
     BOOST At 5-7kHz to add ‘zing’ to clean rhythm sounds.

     CUT below 100Hz or switch in the high-pass (low-cut) filter to reduce low-frequency spill and stage vibration.
     CUT At 200-300Hz if the sound seems boxy.
     CUT At above 5kHz to reduce edginess.
     
  3. MagliteL13

    MagliteL13 Member

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    There's a great series of books that I read when I get the time to by a guy named Paul White. Found em at Amazon.com. Small little things so they're great for reading during downtime. I was gonna post the link, but since it's so long just go to Amazon.com and search for Paul White.
     
  4. cruiser

    cruiser Active Member

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    Yeah, we have his books out here too... they are very good, he a very smart guy :p
     
  5. MagliteL13

    MagliteL13 Member

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    Oh I forgot this link.

    http://harada-sound.com/sound/handbook/ <---That's one of the best sound handbooks avaliable online. It's fun to read, too.
     
  6. seanb

    seanb Member

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    they look good, but they seem a little basic for me. I'm looking for the artistic side of mixing. After reading the Sound Reinforcement Handbook, I know all of my mixer signal stuff... Might check it out, but I'm not sure I'd buy it.
     
  7. wolf825

    wolf825 Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Hi Sean,
    Check out these following links..they are very helpful and informative about EQ for instruments and mixing tips..

    http://www.recordingeq.com/EQ/req0900/primer.htm

    http://www.digitalprosound.com/2002/03_mar/tutorials/mixing_excerpt1.htm
    (the above is from the MIXING ENGINEERS HANDBOOK)

    http://www.recordingeq.com/Subscribe/tip/tascam.htm

    To "learn" EQ frequency's for live and feedback issues, check out and download the Signal Frequency Trainer at:

    http://www.ians-net.co.uk/software/

    Its a program that gives you a graphic EQ on your PC that you can learn and will run random test tones you then have to EQ out. Pretty nifty toy...AND its FREE...

    Also--for various instrument mic techniques--check out AUDIX website. They have a PDF file you can download that gives you a wide variety of mic techniques for various instruments (scroll down to look for the guide)

    http://www.audixusa.com/audix_news.html

    Also--check out www.prosoundweb.com and look in the Study Hall for a TON of great articles, reviews and tips on how-to. Plus they have a bookstore on there which gives a ton of different books out there on engineering and mixing that you may wish to look into besides the Yammie book.. If you are looking for what mic to use for what--that ends up being more of a "personal preference" thing after a while. Post some of your instruments you are concerned for and I'll be glad to define a few good mic's and techniques for the job...Some folks will use all one style of mic for nearly everything--like SM 57's, while others break up to different mics for different uses which is better overall IMO. If you were to ask what is the best kick-drum mic the answer would vary greatly and depend on what STYLE of music, if this was for record or live, whether it was open or closed, and if you were wanting to do a two-mic set up for kick or just a one-mic set up---and for each mic there is about 2 or 3 different WAYS to place it too... So its kinda varied.... But ask away and folks on here will be glad to answer...

    That should keep ya busy for a while....hope this helps ya.

    -wolf
     
  8. seanb

    seanb Member

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    pefect! Totally perfect! Exactly the sort of stuff I was looking for :D Thanks a million wolf :!:
     
  9. The_Terg

    The_Terg Active Member

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    Very VERY helpful linky!
    I spend the bussride today reading the entire thing, and todays rehearsal modeling a few effects on NI Reaktor 3 for our show....
     
  10. magenta

    magenta Member

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    Hello all.

    Can anyone give me a baseline eq for a violin? I think I did it wrong as it sounded "glassy"
    if that means anything...

    I turned 12K almost all the way down..,
    I know there's a lot of variables involved if we are to discuss this in detail.
    Just wanting to know how you guys do it on your end...

    Thanks a bunch!!

    Didn't want to make a new thread... thanks again gents!
     
  11. howlingwolf487

    howlingwolf487 Active Member

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    What type of EQ and/or filter were you using for this?

    When you use a shelving filter that has a "fixed" knee frequency, you'll find that the frequency actually changes based on how much gain/attenuation you apply. This may or may not be a good thing - it depends how you use it.

    If you were using a graphic EQ, any frequencies within at least a couple octaves of that center frequency were affected if you cut it all the way (-15dB?). It sort of depends on the type of filters in the unit, but more or less, that's how it is.

    To my ears, "boxiness" on most instruments is somewhere around 300Hz-400Hz.

    My biggest question is: what setup were you using for miking the violin? I've used an SM81 successfully, but that can get a little scratchy sounding, so be careful. I have also used a headset microphone (Countryman e6) on the violinist with great results.
     
  12. TimmyP1955

    TimmyP1955 Active Member

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    Hear a problem.

    Sweep the high-mid or low-mid to find the problem: You can cut then sweep 'till the problem goes away, or boost then sweep 'till the problem gets worse. The problem frequency will vary depending on a number of variables (the particular instrument, the mic used, the player's technique, and the response anomalies of the system.
     

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