Favorite hammer(s)?

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by gafftapegreenia, Jul 7, 2013.

  1. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    So, now that I find myself doing more and more carpentry, I want to upgrade from my Home Depot 16oz fiber glass handled curve claw hammer. Curious to know what everyone's favorite hammers are. At the moment I'm leaning towards something Estwing (probably a 20 oz) and I'm not planning on going up to Stiletto level. I'd say I do a health mix of finish work, wood chisels, remodel work and other nailing short of house framing. Really I'm looking for a good general use hammer with a bit more oomph and comfort than my current model. So, wood butchers of CB, thoughts?
     
  2. shiben

    shiben Well-Known Member

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    I had a 20 oz eastwing for the longest time and loved it. Now I tend to use a dead blow or a small sledge more often than anything else (or my DeathStick), so Im probably not the best resource, but yeah, the eastwing was really quite nice.
     
  3. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    [Thread moved from General to Scenic.]

    I've always preferred a rip hammer over a claw hammer. Not sure why, maybe I like the sleeker lines.

    I've never used one of the fancy hammers with an anit-vibration tuning fork in the handle, but might if I were pounding lots of nails; but let's face it, who is manually pounding lots of nails these days?

    One should use a round mallet with a chisel, not a hammer.
    .
     
  4. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    I have a 22oz Estwing that I use. I like the handle shape and claw angle that the Estwings have. I have one with the rubberized grip handle and not the wooden handle. Really nice hammer, were I to loose it I'd definitely buy the same one again.
     
  5. josh88

    josh88 Remarkably Tired. Fight Leukemia

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    I have an setting too that I love and have used for everything from sets to framing houses


    Via tapatalk
     
  6. JLNorthGA

    JLNorthGA Active Member

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    Graphite 22 oz framing hammer for nailing. A 2 lb sledge for persuading. A 21 oz dead blow hammer for knocking things together. Of course I do have other hammers also. For fine carpentry and assembly work I have a 12 oz brass tipped dead blow hammer that I got from Grizzly years ago.
     
  7. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

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    Death Sticks are great, but fairly large and more made for framing than finish work. I used to use a headless model from Estwing that was really nice for sinking nails in awkward places, but I'm having trouble finding it on their website.
     
  8. MPowers

    MPowers Well-Known Member

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    I have somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 hammers, all for dfferent jobs. The smallest is 4oz brass head hammer for driving and punching round pins in fire arms when I'm working as a weapons wrangler. The largest is a 16 lb. micrometer fine adjustment tool I use to align rows of stage decks when they need a touch of loving care to match the row next to them, or for driving 36"x1" anchor stakes for large outdoor tents or truss guys and a pneumatic driver is not available. At my age I don't swing the big one any more, I just hand it to one of the kids (someone under 30). Everything else is inbetween from several different upholstry hammers to a nice 40 year old 12oz craftsman and a 50 year old Klien 20oz rip. Got a 22oz and a 24 oz. with 16" wood handle bridge hammers. Of course there's the usual range of 2 lb, 4 lb, 8 & 12 lb mauls for various jobs. I don't think I have one under 25 years old though, so some of the newer versions like the "Death Stick" and such are not in my inventory though I'm sure they're fine hammers. My personal favorite "general" hammer is the Klien 20oz rip with the wood filled tube steel handle.
     
  9. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of ... is there a name for a hammer with a short handle? Regular hammers are fine, but sometimes I need one with a short hammer to pop the pins out of truss. Yes, I'd rather get plated/bolt end truss but renting this stuff is more convenient in many ways.
     
  10. erosing

    erosing The Royal Renaissance Man

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    I've had a Estwing Weight Forward hammer with a fiberglass handle, waffle face, and weighing 21oz for a bit over 3 years now. I believe it comes with a smooth face as well.

    I was also fond of the Dead-on line that had the curved wooden handles, went with the Estwing after using one though.

    Other past favorites include most of the curved handle Stanley anti-vibes and an Estwing blue handled claw hammer.
     
  11. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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  12. jwolfkill

    jwolfkill Member

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    Google "stubby hammer" - you'll get plenty of links.
     
  13. josh88

    josh88 Remarkably Tired. Fight Leukemia

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    I picked one up on clearance when I was working for the depot and have only used it once. It's just worthless. Being stubby, yeah it fits into a tight space but it doesn't have oomph because its so light and there's not enough space to get any momentum. It's like driving a giant tent stake with a tack hammer. I'd rather have something with a bit of mass to it.


    Via tapatalk
     
  14. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    That was a concern for me as well. I haven't gotten over to Sears yet, but I found this one. Sears.com
     
  15. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    I find my Nupla Handi Hammer far more usefully than those stubbie claw hammers sold by the cash register in hardware stores. Its essentially a dead blow without a handle.
    HANDI-HAMMER® POWER DRIVE®
     
    Kelite and (deleted member) like this.
  16. len

    len Well-Known Member

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  17. techieman33

    techieman33 Well-Known Member

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  18. Kelite

    Kelite Apollo Staff Premium Member

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    Having been an Estwing fan since the mid 1980's, I've found the claw angle and comfortable handle a benefit for general purpose work. It was no heavyweight framer but I was pleased to carry it day after day while hanging soffit and fascia. Great hammer! ;)

    The Handi-Hammer would certainly come in handy around the shop though!
     
  19. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    One should, yes, I suppose, but do YOU?

    And I thought that's why most chisels these days come with a metal strike cap. :twisted:
     
  20. techieman33

    techieman33 Well-Known Member

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