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How to brace a free-standing door on a rake?

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by Narpthleg, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. Narpthleg

    Narpthleg New Member

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    I have a door and frame that needs to be freestanding on a raked stage. Ideally, there wouldn't be any sort of base visible from the front, and just feet off the back. But I imagine if I only have feet off the back, because of the angle of the stage, the door is just going to tip forward.
    What do I need to do to support it? Weights on the back? Angle the door upstage slightly? Or will it need to have support form the front as well?

    Thanks!
    N
     
  2. Amiers

    Amiers Lighting Phoenix 1 Lamp at a Time

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    Well the easiest way would be to plum the frame to the rake with front braces.

    You could built the frame at an angle to keep the frame square and the door will stay.

    You could put a door closer or spring on the door depending on the weight of the door.

    Lots of options all with different factors.
     
  3. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
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    So You're putting a door on a rake and you are afraid of it tipping down the rake when in place or when operated. I see two options; lot's of weight on the upstage braces, or the upstage braces need to be screwed to the deck. I would also highly suggest the use of a hollow core door so the weight of the door doesn't pull the jamb and base over when the door is opened D.S.
    I guess there is a third option of counter raking the jamb to a point that it actually tips upstage. This may look funny however.
     
  4. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to Control Booth!

    We need some more info. I assume from your fear of it falling forward that you want the unit portable, and not fixed to the rake. A door that leans back is going to look bizarre and I wouldn't recommend it. The simplest way I can think of (that doesn't involve a base of some kind) is the build the door frame out of steel with a 1/4x1 thresh hold/spreader. Let the stiles of the frame extend down beyond the threshold so you can carry the door onstage and slot it receivers in the rake. Dress up the steel with whatever wood trim you want.
     
  5. Carl75

    Carl75 Member

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    Does the Door have a Threshold? its a framed door from home depot or another home supply store I assume.
    I would suggest building a threshold out of a 2x4 and some plywood so you can screw the bottom of the frame of the door to the 2x4 threshold and screw the threshold to the plywood with about 3 feet of the plywood flat on the rake behind the door upstage and paint it black , throw some sand bags on it and your done.
     
  6. KRISTOF LEOPOLD

    KRISTOF LEOPOLD Member

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    You could also extend the frame of the door below the deck, and brace to the underside of the deck upstage to cantilever.
     
  7. kendal69

    kendal69 Active Member

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    A couple of options. 1) Build the door with a weighted base(sandbags) that is part of the door like wide legs that come forward and the remainder of the door can be made or either foamcore, or gator board. This way you have very little weight high, all the weight would be LOW. You can further lock in the base either screwing into the stage if allowed or industrial velcro. Lastly, you can rig black cable from above to stabilize the entire door from ever falling. Another method would be to use side panels on a 45-degree angle to act as the door bracing, again heavily weighted with sandbags, but visually pleasing as it would just seem like part of the door., use wallpaper etc as it's a section of wall "with a door in it"
     

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