Greetings, everyone.
Our theater is doing a production of 'Outside Mullingar' and, since it's in Ireland, we need rain.
I plan to rent a gobo rotator, and maybe use suspended fishing line with light sweeping down it.
Anyone used either of these techniques, and, if so, how did they work out.
GAM suggests a #521 (Krelve) and #623 (Broken Lines) and a high-speed motor.
Thanks!
 

josh88

Remarkably Tired.
Premium Member
Fight Leukemia
Greetings, everyone.
Our theater is doing a production of 'Outside Mullingar' and, since it's in Ireland, we need rain.
I plan to rent a gobo rotator, and maybe use suspended fishing line with light sweeping down it.
Anyone used either of these techniques, and, if so, how did they work out.
GAM suggests a #521 (Krelve) and #623 (Broken Lines) and a high-speed motor.
Thanks!
Personally, I would skip the rotator and go with an fx strip
http://www.gamonline.com/catalog/filmfx/
 

seanandkate

Well-Known Member
Fight Leukemia
I've used a Rosco effects wheel for snow and rain, and it looks passable, especially when you reinforce that with the sound of rain.
 

Dionysus

Well-Known Member
Ive also used effects wheels for this to great effect. Gobo rotators unless you cut your shutters to one side give you both up and down motion (circular) where only one small part of the effects wheel is in front of the light at a time.
I have found that they are much harder to find these days, along with the wheels for them. But they do a great job.
There is actually one at a theatre around here that I cobbled together out of a little bit of steel, a gel frame and a small motor plugged into a DMX relay. works great. Cut the wheel out of steel left over from some ductwork. Also made them out of plexi before.

Sometimes work exceptionally well paired with a static or rotating gobo.

Also have to say that pairing with sound effects makes ALL THE DIFFERENCE.
 

RonHebbard

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Ive also used effects wheels for this to great effect. Gobo rotators unless you cut your shutters to one side give you both up and down motion (circular) where only one small part of the effects wheel is in front of the light at a time.
I have found that they are much harder to find these days, along with the wheels for them. But they do a great job.
There is actually one at a theatre around here that I cobbled together out of a little bit of steel, a gel frame and a small motor plugged into a DMX relay. works great. Cut the wheel out of steel left over from some ductwork. Also made them out of plexi before.

Sometimes work exceptionally well paired with a static or rotating gobo.

Also have to say that pairing with sound effects makes ALL THE DIFFERENCE.
@Dionysus I've also seen effects wheels fabricated out of heavy aluminum foil oven liners reinforced with coat hanger wire and painted flat / matte black. Often also used with 1/2 or 1/4 split gel colors. Split gels are also often very effective with out of focus gobos for things such as sunlight through tree leaves.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard.
 

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