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Portfolio...

Discussion in 'Education and Career Development' started by meghan, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. meghan

    meghan Member

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    I have to make a portfolio for the art college I'm applying to and have no idea what to include for it. I'm going in undecided but I want to kinda focus in sound or lighing design and also a focus in music. Any ideas of what to include in a portfolio? Thanks a million.
     
  2. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    What you should do is start by collecting any documentation of work that you have done in theatre and music. This includes any groundplans you have drawn, photos of shows you designed, renderings you have made, recordings of your music, sound system flow diagrams, etc. What you want to do is highlight the best work you have done, but also try to show some progression in your work. You probably also want to create a separate portfolio for your music and theatre, because when you go and talk to the music people, the probably don't really want to see your lighting design stuff. On the other hand, when you talk to the theatre people, they will be totally interested in your music background, especially if you tell them you are interested in sound.

    If you know how, and you can submit a portfolio in a digital format, this would be a great way to do it. Building a website for your portfolio creates a very convenient way for colleges and potential employers to view your work. It also means that you don't have to spend a lot of money shipping around a physical portfolio and worrying about it coming back to you, or getting to where it is going.
     
  3. Drmafreek

    Drmafreek Active Member

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    I am in total agreement with icewolf. And try to make it as neat and professional looking as possible. When you're interviewing with someone and you have a nice, neat looking portfolio, it shows that you take the time to put in your best effort.

    As far as digital goes, they are the best things since sliced bread. They are generally easier to update, easier to access, and people can see it without being right there with you. If you want to see a digital version, just look at my signature at the bottom.
     
  4. Jezza

    Jezza Active Member

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    Meghan-

    -I am currently in the same position as yourself in terms of getting a portfolio ready for college reviews. I am interested in pursuing a career in lighting design and have recently enlisted the help of my employer (she has an MFA in Theater and is a guest "portfolio reviewer" for one of the top theater design schools in the country) to help me craft my portfolio. Below are some of her suggestions. I hope you find them helpful.

    "Portfolios are all very individual. The traditional one is black with a multi-ring spine inside. 11x14 is too small, 24x36 is too big. Find something in a size between those. The rings inside should come with at least 10 acetate sleeves. You will need more depending on the size of your portfolio....

    Start off with a strong resume on the first page. Keep it to one page. Don't list references, just say "references upon request" as it save you room. Shows should be arranged in order of what you consider to be best to less-best. Chronological order doesn't matter. Hit them with the best you've got right up front.

    Now here's where it gets sticky. Your portfolio can change depending on what your goal is. If this is the college interview portfolio, then you include all your show information - photos, magic sheet, plot, cue synopsis, hookup. If you have supporting research or a concept - that is always a plus!!! If you're meeting with a director for a design job, then you pull out all the "gearhead" stuff stuff like plots and hookups. If you're meeting with a designer for an assistant job, then you want to point up your "gearhead" stuff...

    After your shows...you can also include other creative works such as drawings, sketches, paintings, photos, etc...

    No here's the tough part...after you have everything collected for your portfolio, in order, all nice and neat... you probably have 25% - 30% too much in there. So go back and look through it and see what you can eliminate. The idea of a portfolio is that it is the highlights - the reader's digest condensed version - of your work. Don't include everything you've done since you were 4!!

    Lastly...and perhaps most importantly... your portfolio needs to have an overall style that reflects who you are. This is achieved through choices in fonts for labeling shows, layout of photos, you're resume's design, etc... Be aware that the interview begins the moment you cross the threshold and doesn't end until you've left the building. You may not think they are paying attention to you...but they are."
     
  5. meghan

    meghan Member

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    I double checked what the art college kinda wants in a portfolio and so far its a lot of sketches, painting, photos etc. Thats the basics they want. Then for lighting anything having to do with lighting and with sound also anything with sound but also a recording of any musical instrument I play. They basically want anything I have. I have two teachers at my school helping me and they basically told me put anything I have and write a couple sentences on each piece of artwork like why I sketched that etc. Thanks for all the input!!
     
  6. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Saving room by sacrificing references can be a risky thing to do. This of course is a much debated topic, but leaving out references on your resume can hurt you. If you leave references off your resume and a potential employer wanted to call them, they are more likely to move on to the next candidate as opposed to calling you to get your references. Aside from a listing of things that you claim to have done or claim to know, an resume is a way to name drop, and references are another great way to get names on your resume.
     
  7. Jezza

    Jezza Active Member

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    Totally agree, however for a college portfolio review, having your references listed is not necessary. More likely than not, the same person who they would have called for a reference is the person who wrote you a letter of recommendation. Colleges aren't going to call your employers and ask for a reference. On a normal resume, I fully agree that references should be there and highlighted though.
     
  8. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    I only do it because I have a complicated situation with my primary reference and first employer.
    He died last January, and she hardly knew me because I essentially worked for my supervisor(the aforementioned first reference)
    It hasn't seemed to hurt me at all in the job market.
    I've had several offers, all but 1 of which have resulted in logistical issues preventing me from taking the job.(geography and scheduling mainly)
    The exception is an internship that may or may not be paid.
    (non-paying is not an option at this point in my life)
     

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