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Safety and Flying Video Screens

Discussion in 'Multimedia, Projection, and Show Control' started by SPA, Nov 11, 2008.

  1. SPA

    SPA Member

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    I'm rather new to flying equipment but as I was studying the rigging pages I read where it isn't safe to raise equipment with steal wire cable. What is the suggested method for raising and flying a 10x10 truss frame screen?
     
  2. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Please see the following, from Control Booth's TOS: "The users of ControlBooth, in a effort to police themselves, have evolved the following: No discussion of "how-to" of rigging, pyrotechnics, and electrical will be permitted. Our stock answer to these questions is always "Consult a qualified professional."

    That being said, I'm curious as to where you read the highlighted portion above. Would you please cite the source?
     
  3. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    Why are you asking this question?
    (just curious)
     
  4. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

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    As has been pointed out the only answer we can give you is consult a qualified professional, but I too would really like to see where you read that you're not supposed to use steel cable. Would you please tell us were you read that. You might not be getting the information you are looking for from us but you might also be onto some interesting reading.
     
  5. SPA

    SPA Member

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    I will have to look for that again. I've searched several sites researching. But from the sounds of it this site was misleading and wrong.
     
  6. willbb123

    willbb123 Active Member

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    I believe that steel cable from hardware stores is not rated for overhead lifting.

    Thats daring joining a site then saying that there info is misleading and wrong.
     
  7. zuixro

    zuixro Active Member

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    I think he was referring to the site he read that on.
     
  8. TimMiller

    TimMiller Well-Known Member

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    wire rope is very safe to be used over head, BUT IT MUST BE PROPERLY MADE. I have all of ours made at a hydraulic supply house, in which when they make a batch of them they make several extras to load test to failure. They also put metal tags on them stating what the load is in several different configurations. I would never make my own cables to use for flying. Also using turn buckles are extremely dangerous, many people use them so they can "tweak" the sides to get them even, but i have seen them work themselves loose and send things flying down. Also we use steel safetys where ever span sets are used (you should always be sure that any company you higher in does this) so in the event of a fire the span sets will melt and the steel safetys will take the load, saving your rig from falling on people and fire fighters.
     
  9. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    True, unless they are properly moused. Obviously, if they didn't do that, they were probably not properly trained riggers in the first place.

    Not only should the safeties be used in case of a fire, but also for poor lighting design. Often times in RnR and corporate gigs, they use truss warmers which can effectively melt span sets (I watched it happen in less than 30 minutes). While the outer jacket may not fail (initially), the failure of the inner fibers will render it useless and cause a potential collapse, especially if more than one fails.
     
  10. TimMiller

    TimMiller Well-Known Member

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    you should never put a conventional around a spanset where it can potentially melt it, as a rule of thumb.
     
  11. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    Dude there are VERY FEW things at your local hardware store that a real rigger would trust for overhead lifting. Unfortunately there are a lot of small schools and theaters that think they know what they are doing and use the Chinese made crap readily available at the local hardware store. It may last for a while, but it's not at all safe.

    As for the original post. I have to say that you have been given some "interesting" information. However the fact that you have to ask that question in the first place shows that you are NOT qualified to do whatever it is you are thinking about doing. Nothing personal here friend, you either know this stuff or not. If you don't you make mistakes and people get killed. That's why we take it very seriously on this site. Personally, I've been trained and feel quite confident rigging set pieces to fly in and out. However, recently we installed a subwoofer overhead in my theater. I knew the proper technique to use but I chose to hire a professional to hang it because hanging a 100lb speaker over the audience is beyond my abilities as a rigger. I know my limits, I know what I'm qualified to do, and I do not push those limits. You should do the same. Hire a qualified professional to hang your screen.
     
  12. TimMiller

    TimMiller Well-Known Member

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    I am thankful that our local hardware store sells rigging supplies, such as shackles and spansets large enough to hoist a cement truck :D.
     
  13. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    Maybe I wasn't clear. It was the beam that melted the spanset, not the heat from the spanset touching the instrument. It had been an intentional test to show that light itself can cause failures in rigging. Then again, in HS, we would hang scoops as a pizza warmers when doing an after party. It's the same thing they do in the fast food chains (well, they don't use scoops, but light energy is the same).
     
  14. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    Everything's bigger in Texas.

    Let me make my point more clearly. There are very few products sold at Home Depot, Lowes, or Ace Hardware that would be trusted by a professional rigger. If the only name stamped on the chain, shackle, quicklink, etc... is China, it is not to be trusted.
     
  15. wadeace

    wadeace Member

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    first off you should always hire a trained certified professional. bold on certified. ask for credentials. we have two American certified riggers on over hire and staff at our theater. we called in foy to fly some kids in the local production of the nutcracker, for obvious insurance reasons. well i walk on stage during a tech call and overhear a conversation about never saddle a dead horse and ill take pictures of it and send it off to my boss for approval
     
  16. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    The general rule down here is that if it doesn't have it's SWL manufacturer marked on it (stamping on shackles etc) then it's load rating should be considered to be your keys (a normal person's keys that is). This also in part shifts the liability to the manufacturer provided it is used within load.

    In Aus, the law is that a rigger must be ticketed. Failure to use such a person would be at your own risk, but when insurers and Workcover come knocking, I'd prefer not to be there...
     

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