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Security Theater

Discussion in 'Safety' started by bobgaggle, Jun 14, 2019 at 9:19 AM.

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Is security theater worth it?

  1. Yes, Its a deterrent to crime

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No, Its a show for sheeple

    4 vote(s)
    66.7%
  3. Maybe, What's the harm?

    3 vote(s)
    50.0%
  4. No, Its a needless violation of privacy

    1 vote(s)
    16.7%
  5. Yes, it makes people feel safe, and feelings trump facts.

    1 vote(s)
    16.7%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    I think this has been discussed before, but I went to my first concert in about 7 years and was amazed at how "security" has been ramped up. Had to walk through a metal detector to even get in the building. The guy took 10 seconds to examine my keys, another 10 to look through my wallet?! wtf is going on? I'm gonna be the guy who commits the next mass killing at a concert with a keychain knife? Maybe I've got one of those "survival" cards that slips into a wallet and has a screwdriver and a blade in it? When we were walking to the venue, we passed the alley to the loading dock, guarded by a flimsy barricade and one less than fit man who was busy ogling the female passersby. In most of the arenas/big road houses I've worked at, if you look like you're supposed to be there no one is going to challenge you. And in this industry, all you need is a black shirt and some cargo pants to look like you belong (maybe also a disgruntled demeanor). There's no way its difficult to sneak into these places, especially if you've got a sinister motive...
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  2. sk8rsdad

    sk8rsdad Well-Known Member Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    The survey misses an important option: Yes, it makes my insurance company and/or lawyer happy
     
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  3. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Theatre Consultant
    Location:
    Clayton NY 13624
    Yup. "I'm with the show...." and I'm in.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  4. Calc

    Calc Active Member

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    I do think it's important to define what Security Theatre is. There are useful applications of some security restrictions that I feel do actually boost safety in some situations. A moderate amount of security will help filter out low-level troublemakers.
    That said, there's nothing you can do to stop someone truly determined to cause damage, and pretending otherwise is mostly a CYA move. Invent a perfect security gate, and they can just attack the line to get in.

    At Venue X I go to the guard station, self identify/cross my name off the list, and get a paper pass that lets me go wherever for the day. I only work there ~10 days a year, so nobody outside the crew recognizes me. It keeps patrons out of the back stage area, but that's it security-wise. Low hassle, low security, but does the intended job.
    Venue Y's corporate owner had an attack on one of their venues a few years back, and rolled out metal detectors afterward. I have keys to the building. I park in the back by the dock, walk through the whole building up to the front, fail the metal detector due to my steel toe shoes, and then get a easily-duplicated paper pass for the day. Security Theatre.
     
    RonHebbard likes this.
  5. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Location:
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    A university has miles of underground service tunnels throughout their campus. The tunnels distribute natural gas, super heated water (pressurized to keep it from boiling at only 212 Fahrenheit) circulated chilled brine, 3 phase Delta AC at 13.8 and 27.6 KV and high pressure air as well as less hazardous items such as telephone and data cables.
    You wouldn't want to be trapped in the tunnels if / when something failed and sprung a leak. Because of this, wherever the tunnel passes under or next to a building there's a brightly illuminate exit door with an easy to actuate crash bar. If you manage to get yourself to and through a door, it closes behind you and you find yourself in a small secure room with a bench seat to sit or lay on, the mere fact that you've entered any of their secure rooms alerts the campus police and paramedics. Cameras and microphones monitor each room and two way communication asks your identity, if you're injured, why you've escaped the tunnel, yada, yada, etcetera. Each emergency escape door is its own little person-trap and includes bottled water and emergency first aid items. Once you've escaped the tunnels, and let the door close behind you, you're securely trapped until armed campus police come to your aid. I spent months of my apprenticeship in those underground tunnels and always felt safe and secure. On the plus side, no matter the weather above ground it was always pleasant in the tunnels, you doffed your heavy parka or your sunglasses the moment you descended into the tunnels and you spent your shift in the comfy little underground world totally unaware if it was raining or snowing above ground. Every 1/4 mile or so there were massive security gates locked with 9 tumbler locks and monitored by cameras. If you had need to pass through any of the gates you pushed a call button, a campus cop would interrogate you and dispatch a minion to let you through and re-lock the gate behind you.
    EDIT: To add a few more details for Mr. Gaggle and anyone playing along at home.
    @bobgaggle To expound further on the above.
    Each escape room had two doors; one in from the tunnel side and a second door from the basement of the closest building. The doors were interlocked so they couldn't be opened simultaneously. If someone opened the door from a building's side, crash bar be danged, you weren't getting out of the tunnel. Once in the safe room with the tunnel door closed behind you, anyone from the building side could open their door into the safe room.
    One of the safe rooms was INTERESTING, it was part of the basement of the smallest building on campus. Because their basement was so cramped, the denizens of the building had a coin operated warm and cold drink dispensing machine housed in their safe room. As long as the tunnel door was securely closed and latched, anyone from the building could walk in, place a conveniently stored scrap of 2 x 4 in their door, buy a few beverages, and return to their safe and secure little building. During good weather I, as the electrical apprentice, would trot around a tunnel or two taking orders and collecting funds from most of the electrical journeymen prior to heading up to a regularly scheduled coffee truck. The truck had the normal assortment of hot and cold beverages, hot dogs, burgers, sandwiches and condiments plus (secreted under the ice on the other side of the truck) brown bottles of chilled beer and a supply of suitably sized brown paper bags [you had to be a regular customer to know about Larry's secret stash] If the weather was particularly nasty, I took to taking orders for warm and / or cold beverages (but no food) then heading for the escape door leading to the basement of the smallest building on campus. As long as no one from their side had their door open, I could hit the crash bar, stick the 2 x 4 in the tunnel door buy hot and cold beverages and return to the sanctity of the tunnels. If the crash bar wouldn't let me in, I'd wait until the building's residents had vacated and closed their door, then it was my turn. Occasionally I'd be in the room buying ten or a dozen drinks from the machine and someone from the building side would try to gain access and wonder why their door was "stuck". It became a fun little game during ice storms and similarly inclement weather. I'd walk in through the door from the tunnel, put the 2 x 4 in the door, doff my hardhat, wave at the camera, buy my beverages and head back into the tunnels. I think the machine even had warm cups of soup. It was the most popular 'safe room' on the campus. I wonder if the vending machine's operator wondered why his business dropped off drastically when the one or two year tunnel project was completed. Myself, I only spent six or eight months on the tunnel project with an additional couple of months a few years later.
    Thanks for the memories Mr. Gaggle.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019 at 8:09 PM
    bobgaggle likes this.
  6. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    That wouldn't be the University of Waterloo would it?
     
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  7. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Location:
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    @bobgaggle No Sir! Neither University of Waterloo nor its immediate neighbor Waterloo Lutheran University, more commonly WLU, although I think I'm recalling a name change some decades back to remove "Lutheran" from their official name.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard
     

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