The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

Tape to cover seams?

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by cvanp, Jan 31, 2008.

  1. cvanp

    cvanp Active Member

    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hey everyone,

    Our set has a bunch of seams in it because of the way it was constructed... now the question is, how do we cover and eliminate these seams? It's been a pretty consistent vote for tape even though in my history with it, tape tends to bubble up and become noticeable. Still, tape seems to be what people want to use, they don't want to deal with any kind of filling material.

    So my question - is there a certain kind of tape we can use to cover the seams that won't bubble up and will be paintable?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1,134
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    When Dutchman-ing, I've found using 3" masking tape will work but you want the blue stuff. I'm also a big fan of using Latex Painters Caulk. If you build a set in a shop, slice the seems, load it onto a truck, then re-assemble in the theatre , the caulk can be a God send. Internal seams on a flat are best dealt with, with Bondo, as Joint compound tends to be too fragile for transport.
    But if everyone is married to the tape Idea, the wider the better.

    I don't think Dutchman is in the Wikki yet I'll have to fix that. Dutchman-ing flats used to be done with strips of muslin dipped into glue. You would apply the dutchman over the seam in question, working out all the bubbles with a paint brush. you would then paint over everything. Worked really well in bigger theatres. Now days we tend to spend a whole lot more time working on seams, as the set I'm working on right now would attest to.
     
  3. deadlygopher

    deadlygopher Member

    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    6
    Occupation:
    Automation/Software Developer
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    We still do the muslin in glue method of dutchman. It looks great when done well, but it is very hard to get right. I hope I'll figure it out someday, but we have a freshman who is good at it, so I don't really have to.
     
  4. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    5,948
    Likes Received:
    225
    Occupation:
    Stagehand/ Production Company Owner
    Location:
    Howell, NJ
    If you're in the mood for fun you could you use fiberglass tape and drywall joint compound.
     
  5. punktech

    punktech Active Member

    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Near NYC
    i don't really see why the people you're working with think that tape will be any easier, you'll still have to spend a considerable amount of time taping the seams, it's hard to work the bubbles out and get a straight tape line. personally i'd prefer to spend that time on a joint compound, as it would look nicer in the end.
     
  6. cvanp

    cvanp Active Member

    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    2
    punktech: that's my argument, but it hasn't worked so far.
     
  7. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1,134
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    Yes but the mess factor is greatly reduced with Tape. Still Latex painters caulk is my preferred method.
     
  8. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,077
    Likes Received:
    681
    Occupation:
    Controls Technician - TAIT Towers
    Location:
    Lititz, PA
    I always enjoyed dutch-ing a set. Get all covered in glue and then peel it off your hands for hours. So much fun! Oh and it looks really nice too when done well.
     
  9. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

    Messages:
    4,425
    Likes Received:
    2,814
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV, USA
    Don't worry about the seams. The Lighting Designer will fix it.
     
  10. TupeloTechie

    TupeloTechie Active Member

    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    New York City
    our teacher likes to tape them with white gaff, then paint over it. the gaff dose not get bubbles and it somewhat matches the texture of the muslin on the flat, however it is still kinda noticeable.
     
  11. punktech

    punktech Active Member

    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Near NYC
    tell them that the cost effectiveness of the tape will be pretty much so obliterated by the fact that you will have to spend many man hours putting it on, and that it would be significantly better looking (use the aesthetically pleasing to the audience argument if art directors and the director are involved).
     
  12. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1,134
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    Holy Crap Batman!?!?! I wish I had a budget that would allow me to use Gaff for dutchmanning! That's expensive.
     
  13. TupeloTechie

    TupeloTechie Active Member

    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    New York City
    we have small sets, no more than 7-8 seams per show, plus for some reason we have like 6 rolls of white gaff laying around, and I never use white gaff for anything, except for dutchmanning
     
  14. punktech

    punktech Active Member

    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Near NYC
    once you start realizing the joy of labeling (or a few freshmen do) that white gaff will disappear in the blink of an eye...
     
  15. TupeloTechie

    TupeloTechie Active Member

    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    New York City
    what would I want to label with gaff? I use board tape for the console and an electric label maker for anything else...
     
  16. punktech

    punktech Active Member

    Messages:
    226
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Near NYC
    when cabling i love me my roll of 2 of white gaff. every time i have to add another length i rip off two pieces and write the circuit number on each and then slap them on the plugs. makes it about one million times easier to troubleshoot stuff and it generally helps keep things neater. it's VERY nice when using socapex. i hated life until i found this, no more guessing if you're pulling the right sh*t, all you have to do is look at the plug on the instrument and keep following that number...*sighs* i remember the dark ages...
     
  17. David Ashton

    David Ashton Active Member

    Messages:
    828
    Likes Received:
    88
    Occupation:
    truck driver
    Location:
    perth W Australia
    I have toured small sets for years a always used plain masking tape and painted over it, mind you these are generally one night stands and an immaculate job is not required, however it works ok for me.
     
  18. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    667
    Likes Received:
    212
    Occupation:
    Shop Foreman
    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    In my department we usually use aluminum tape to cover seams. Don't ask me why, its what the director wants (as I said in another thread, she's anal about weird things). Its expensive, wrinkles too easily, and only sticks to our usually foam set pieces before paint is applied (no room for patch-ups after the art department has had their way with the set)
     
  19. RiffRaff54

    RiffRaff54 Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    North-east Ohio
    I like when people do that, except for when they don't take it off and every cable has 2-4 pieces of old gaff on it. Some people at my college aren't that smart :(

    edit by [user]derekleffew[/user]: See the thread AND Glossary Entry "Courtesy Tabs".
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 3, 2008
  20. cvanp

    cvanp Active Member

    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    2
    So suppose I want to use latex painters caulk to get these seams fixed up. What is the appropriate process?
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice