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Design Issues and Solutions Need help designing rep plot!

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by kfd29, Jul 23, 2008.

  1. kfd29

    kfd29 Member

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    Our electrics operate on the repeating circuit/dimmer theory. ie.. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12.

    I would like to create a RGBW + S4 rep plot... haven't found a good way to do it and have a nice, even wash plus the S4 special available. It would be nice to be able to have one fixture per circuit but probably not possible, that'll only leave us with 12.

    This is for each electric 1-4, on stage for wash plus the S4 for specials, each electric has 24 plugs, 12 circuits repeating twice as shown above.

    Any suggestions?!
     
  2. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    3 areas? Do you want side light? How bigs the stage? Also, I would stay away from the green, having red, lav, and blue can be helpful.
     
  3. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I second avoiding green. For RGB mixing you need lots of hard-edged units and a lot of patience. A particular trait of green though is that the particular color is very unflattering for skin tones, and makes people look sickly and other-worldly, so you may be much better off staying away from that.
     
  4. waynehoskins

    waynehoskins Active Member

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    Yep...

    The first thing we learned about color in high school was how additive and subtractive color mixing worked. What we didn't learn, though, is that the additive method doesn't work as nicely in practice as it does in theory, because the color of an incandescent lamp changes as you dim it, it drifts to amber.

    So yeah, ditch the RGB idea. Personally I'd go with neutral arealight (I lean to lavenders; 52's my go-to front color), and add warm and cool (amber and blue, like 16 and 64) colorwashes from each side, box-boomish.

    A couple of colors of sidelight, and maybe even a couple of toplight, and probably a neutral back, and you're in business.

    I'd do sides probably pipe-end, maybe tailed-down.

    Three or five areas across, depending on the size of your stage and your fixtures and positions. Two or three deep, making 6, 9, 10, or 15 areas of frontlight. You might also be able to get away with twofering some areas as you go upstage, because often one won't be used without another.

    Sidelight doesn't usually need to be broken up into as fine areas; full-stage-width zones are usually sufficient and can free up some circuits. Same for topwash, that usually runs in the same sorts of zones. Sometimes it's nice to isolate backs to an area.

    If you have spares, you can throw some breakups in there too.

    I've found it useful to have specials midstage left and right often, at least with the director I've worked with most. Allocate at least a couple of circuits per electric for specials. If you can have a GMOT circuit on each electric, that's really nice too (GMOT = Get Me Out of Trouble).

    That's what I'd do; your mileage may vary.
     
  5. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Re: Need help designing Rep. Plot/House Plot!

    kfd29, more questions for you. Is this for a House Plot, or Repertory Plot? There's a distinct difference, as the latter is somewhat show-dependent. What types of shows are presented? We need to know what type and how many fixtures you have available. Also, does the 4th Electric have to light the cyc as well, or is there a 5th, or cyclt. pipe? Since you haven't told us about any FOH or Box Boom positions, we have to assume you have those covered. Take a look at [user]SteveB[/user]'s rep. plot, (may not be entirely current or accurate). Ignoring the grayed fixtures, it uses/could use less than 12 circuits per electric. His theatre does lots of dance, so he has an abundance of sidelight. For you, since you (probably) don't have ladders, you'll need to make do with Pipe Ends.

    I agree with all the others, skip the RGBW idea, unless you just want to hang 4-ckt borderlights
    [​IMG]
    over the stage, which worked just fine for fifty years, thank you very much!

    Answer our questions, so we can "help" you some more, by asking even more questions. Also, stop by the New Member Board, and start a thread introducing yourself. We'll have more questions for you over there.:lol:
     
  6. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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  7. kfd29

    kfd29 Member

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    Derek,

    I'll correct that and say House Plot. I'd say our top 3 shows/events are: HS Musicals/Drama, Assembly/Presentation, and Dance Comps/Recitals. For assemblies we usually drop the Downstage so not much need for a wash outside of the FOH/Catwalk.

    Fixtures avail for use: about 20 fresnels, 10 S4 w/ 36 degrees, 12 S4 PARnels. Would like to purchase either PAR64's or S4 PARs to replace our dying fresnels.. any suggestions on that as well? Seems like the PAR64's have a nicer, smooth wash but the S4 PARs are definately more versatile as far as lens changes instead of lamps.

    Cyc is lit by the 5th so we can fully utilize 1-4 for stage wash.
     
  8. waynehoskins

    waynehoskins Active Member

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    You have five? In college we had three, at the high school there are but two.

    Five electrics, and only 20 Fresnels, 10 436s and 12 Parnels?

    How are the Fresnels dying? They're about the simplest fixture design out there. Fix 'em, and then see if you can augment the inventory. By the way, whose Fresnel?

    With that stock, I'd use 36s for fronts, the others for the rest.
     
  9. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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  10. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Have you tried any of the commercially available "lens removal tools"?
    [​IMG]
    I've never needed/used any tool. With the fixture hanging and pointing straight down (and unplugged!), position the spring clip at the top nearest the colorframe clip. While squeezing the spring clip, whack the top of the fixture with the fleshy part of one's open palm. The lens gently drops into one's hand.
     
  11. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    The method you describe never seems to work for me. I admit to needing more practice.

    But I like the tool - just have no clue who sells it - it's not a joke, correct ?, as it looks like a home made thingie from a gobo holder.

    Whose is this ?.

    SB
     
  12. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I can't seem to find a US vendor; here's the link to a UK one: Terralec. £1.50 is ~$2.97, which certainly seems reasonable enough. Anyone know an American vendor?
     
  13. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I have looked into getting one of those, I usually dont need one, but if you have a set of fresh out of the box fixtures those clips can be a real bear. Maybe I'll pick one up.
     
  14. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    Definitely nicer to go with the S4 PAR since you can share the lamps. However, don't forget that the quality of light from a Fresnel is different from any PAR. In other words, I'd try to fix a few of them anyway even if you "replace" them with PARs.
     
  15. Lightingguy32

    Lightingguy32 Active Member

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    Instead of all S4-PARS why not split it and get some S4-PARnel units?
     
  16. Lightingguy32

    Lightingguy32 Active Member

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    Do you happen to have a rough sketch of the theater along with where the lighting positions are?
     
  17. cdub260

    cdub260 CBMod CB Mods

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    While this trick works fairly well with Source 4 Pars, it doesn't work that well with Parnels, which I have a few of in my inventory.

    I actually made my own lens removal tool by cutting a foot off the end of a steel fish tape and bending the tip at about a 45 degree angle. Then I painted the thing orange, except for the tip, so I wouldn't lose it. It works great for getting my Parnel lenses off for cleaning. Of course to get the second lens out, you have to disassemble the light, but that's another matter all together.
     
  18. Serendipity

    Serendipity Active Member Premium Member

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    How exactly does the tool work? The website didn't seem to have an explanation.
    I'd guess the center of the tool is for the spring clip, and the other branches wrap around the lens. Yes/no?

    It's an amusing tool, and the fact it looks like mangled gobo holder makes it even more excellent.
     

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