The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

resetting sensor rack errors

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by TimMiller, Jan 8, 2009.

  1. TimMiller

    TimMiller Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,293
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    Houston, Tx
    I was at a school and they have two sensor racks and both were throwing big hissy fits. They both were in desperate needs of cleaning. I did try to clear the errors with the doors open but i cannot remember how to reset the errors. I though you just pushed clear or reset to clear the errors, but it has been a while since i have played with the CEM's. I pushed clear, nothing happened, so i pushed reset, the CEM reset but gave me the same errors, they were air flow, rack over temp, dimmers xx, xx, xx.... over temp, and backup mismatch. Most errors i have seen on a rack. My button pushing finger was getting sore scrolling through all of the errors. I am going to go in next week or the week after and do a full maintenance cleaning on both of their racks. I will have to schedule some time for their theater to be dark since the dust is so caked up i will have to shut down the racks and suck as much dust out as possible then blow the rest of it out. I figured the rack wouldn't throw a over temp error if there wasn't a load on it and the room temp was rather cool.
     
  2. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    New Haven Area, CT
    I had to do that recently, do you have to power down the racks or does pulling out all of the dimmers and the control module do enough? When I did it last, I did kill the power to the rack, but I was just wondering whether or not that's neccesary.
     
  3. DCATTechie

    DCATTechie Active Member

    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Dublin, OH
    To the best of my knowledge there is no way to clear the errors UNTIL the errors are fixed. Each time the CEM module resets I think it does a system scan and searches for problems. If a problem appears it will continue to flash the error code until the sensors see that everything is back to normal. My guess is that it does this to prevent the user from ignoring the problems and causing severe damage to the rack and the surrounding area. Once you clean the rack and fix the errors, flip on the main breaker, then reset the CEM and the messages should go away. If they don't I reccomend call ETC because it might be a faulty sensor or a problem in the CEM module.
     
  4. DCATTechie

    DCATTechie Active Member

    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Dublin, OH
    I always kill power to the rack just to avoid risk or electrocution, wandering fingers tend to turn on dimmers when I least want them to be on. I also kill power because I clean the fans, and they're kind of difficult to clean when they're spinning around;). My advice, don't be throwing your fingers anywhere where there is 120v power flowing around.
     
  5. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,556
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    KILL THE PANEL!!!! 100% absolutely without a doubt, KILL THE PANEL!!!

    Mike
     
  6. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

    Messages:
    4,400
    Likes Received:
    2,784
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV, USA
    If, after throughly cleaning the rack with all sources of energy removed, after a reset the CEM errors still persist, while at the rack, call Technical Support at 1.800.688.4116. There are configuration settings that ETC does not like to disclose because in the wrong hands they can create real havoc. I call them every time I have to move a CEM from one type of rack to another, for example.
     
  7. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,556
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Yeah, I got a wierd error on a Unison rack once and they had to run me through some menu levels that I didn't know existed to fix the problem. I have to say though I have noticed a disturbing trend among schools, churches, and community theaters of not doing routine maintenance on their gear. Believe me it is cheaper to pay a professional to maintain your gear than it is to get it fixed when it breaks down. My dad has 30+ years in maintenance and you can not underestimate its importance. I know this is not practical for most venues but at the PAC we had 1/3 of our inventory down for maintenance at all times. It simply was not available and would be switched out with another 1/3 every 4 months. Kept everything running very smoothly.

    Mike
     
  8. Chris Chapman

    Chris Chapman Active Member

    Messages:
    439
    Likes Received:
    33
    Occupation:
    Technical Director
    Location:
    Greenville, Michigan, United States
    Double check which hardware version of the CEM you have as well. Original CEM modules didn't have a "snorkel" airflor attachment that drew air into the unit and cooled the CPU. Our first rounds of CEM's (Circa 97-98) did not have these and would give us flaky over temp and Dimmer Fail messages.

    The snorkel is a little metal tube on the left hand side of the Mother Board, by the face plate. (I think.)
     
  9. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,067
    Likes Received:
    669
    Occupation:
    Controls Technician - TAIT Towers
    Location:
    Lititz, PA
    Is is a Sensor rack or a Sensor+ Rack? It makes a little difference. In a Sensor rack, the airflow sensor was notorious for getting clogged, you may have to vacuum or blow that clean, it is on the CEM. The Overtemp error won't clear until the rack come back to the right temp. Overtemp is probably due to the fact that the filters are clogged and air circulation is poor.
     
  10. Sony

    Sony Active Member

    Messages:
    856
    Likes Received:
    96
    Occupation:
    Freelance Electrician/Rigger
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    ALWAYS DE-ENERGIZE YOUR RACK WHEN YOU ARE PULLING MODULES FOR CLEANING. The modules are in theory hot swappable in a Sensor Rack BUT you should only do so in emergency situations such as if one catastrophically fails during a show and you REALLY need it and then you should only do it when there is NO LOAD on the module i.e. it's turned off. More importantly is when you are removing a large amount of modules for cleaning you could very easily brush one of the live Feed Plates and kill yourself. It's just plain common sense that when you are doing anything inside a rack that you need to de-energize the rack.

    I've been told by a couple people that the CEM's are hot swappable too but I don't think I would ever be comfortable doing that.
     
  11. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    New Haven Area, CT
    I don't have an ETC, nor did I plan on cleaning without de-energizing, but I wasn't sure as being as on an innovator rack when you pull out the control module, the fan and everything turn off, I wasn't sure if it also killed power.
     
  12. Sony

    Sony Active Member

    Messages:
    856
    Likes Received:
    96
    Occupation:
    Freelance Electrician/Rigger
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    If I removed your brain would you still function? No...

    The rack doesn't turn off it just stops functioning because you removed the control module. The fan and all the modules only run when they are getting signal from the control module. The same thing happens on ETC Rack and every other rack that has ever been made. I can guarantee that your feed plates are still very live and VERY deadly.

    You're very brave unplugging your Control Module when the rack is still energized. I don't know if the Innovator racks are mean to do that...you could very easily fry your Control Module and then you'd be out a CM, a whole Rack and easily $2,000 to get it fixed. I'm sure your administration would not be happy about that. Rule of thumb is ALWAYS de-energize your rack whenever you are doing any servicing. Hot swapping is meant to be a last resort in dire emergencies...i.e. fixing a failure during a live performance when de-energizing an entire rack is not an option.
     
  13. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    New Haven Area, CT
    I figured as much, however, the guy before me who quit the crew had told me that the control module was hot-swappable.

    I also figured that they were still energized, but wasn't sure. I'd never dare do anything before de-energizing, but was just wondering.
     
  14. cdub260

    cdub260 CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    1,303
    Likes Received:
    149
    Location:
    Southern California
    I've seen a lot of mentions in this thread about the need to de-energize the rack prior to servicing, but not one about using lockout/tagout procedures when doing so. For your own protection, when you de-energize the rack, you need to lock out the switch or breaker for the main power feed, so that no random passers by can re-energize the rack while you're working on it. This should be standard procedure when powering down any electrical system that you intend to work on, even if it's as simple as changing out a receptacle.
     
    Esoteric and (deleted member) like this.
  15. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,556
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Certainly. However in every install I do, the breaker for the dimmers is very close to the dimmer rack, so that someone going to "mess with" the breaker would have to walk past/across the person working on the rack. But if that is not the case, then you MUST make sure that no one can accidentally or otherwise repower the rack while you are working on it. Then when you are done, get the panel moved!!!

    Mike
     
  16. TimMiller

    TimMiller Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,293
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    Houston, Tx
    i am going to pull all of the modules out of this rack and give it a very good cleaning. But I am then going to teach them how to do simple cleaning procedures such as cleaning the air filter and vacuuming off the front of the dimmers. This school is several years old, and they just got a new theater teacher who actually cares about theater and understands that everything in the theater is lacking in maintance.
     
  17. Sony

    Sony Active Member

    Messages:
    856
    Likes Received:
    96
    Occupation:
    Freelance Electrician/Rigger
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Good catch, like Esoteric all the racks I have worked on have had the service disconnect right next to me while working on the rack. I however definitely agree that you should use proper lockout/tagout procedures, ESPECIALLY if the disconnect is in another room or somewhere out of sight from where you are working.
     
  18. renegadeblack

    renegadeblack Active Member

    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    New Haven Area, CT
    Yeah, the disconnect is in the basement which is a fair distance from the actual dimmers. When I cleaned it out, I put red tape over the breaker saying don't turn me back on, maintenance underway or something of that sort, fortunately, it's fairly rare that people even go down there so the chance of someone even going down there and flipping it is fairly slim.
     
  19. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,556
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    I would still want to lock the panel if I were you. Then I would go out and bid an electrician to have the panel moved (or a disconnect added) in the dimmer room.

    Mike
     
  20. TimMiller

    TimMiller Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,293
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    Houston, Tx
    rather than moving a panel just use proper lock out tag out procedures. they sell locks at Grainger Industrial Supply for breakers and disconnects of all sizes. Then someone would have to cut the lock in order to turn it on.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice