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Slash Line (noun)?

Discussion in 'Question of the Day' started by derekleffew, Oct 30, 2017.

  1. JChenault

    JChenault Well-Known Member

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    IMG_0049.JPG In the belief that every kitchen needs a theme, and we like trompe loiel this is our kitchen art. The rope is real. The knife painted.
     
  2. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  3. teqniqal

    teqniqal Well-Known Member

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    Well, if you are talking about the Fire Curtain Perimeter Release Line that is to be 'slashed' to release the Fire Curtain, I've found that most of them have all had the cut knife removed ("to keep the children from hurting themselves") and sometimes it is replaced with a big wire cutter ('dikes', small bolt cutters) or a dull hack-saw blade (so you can burn-to death-while sawing the rope in two). Modern Fire Curtain release systems just anchor the end of the perimeter rope to a ring and it is released by manually pulling it off of a pin on the wall, or by pulling a hitch-pin out of a bracket that holds the ring.

    Another answer might relate to a horror play script where the attacker yells " I'm gonna cut yur scurvy hide into little pieces and feed ya to the fishes!" - That would be a 'slasher line'.

    Or any lyric from the songs of the many bands names 'Slasher' . . .
     
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  4. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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  5. Daniel Yannantuono

    Daniel Yannantuono Member

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    You would find it going through all of the expensive items on your wish list of purchases
     
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  6. venuetech

    venuetech Well-Known Member

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    When I proposed the question I had no intention of " inventing" a new term. Slash line was simply the term I was taught. Clearly a few other members had a very good idea just what was meant by it. Search engines are a great tool for finding terms but they are only as good as their spiders make them. Cut line or slash line that method of triggering the (asbestos) fire curtain is long gone. In today's world it is likely best that a slash line belongs to the costume shop.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2017
  7. IsaacKirkwood

    IsaacKirkwood Member

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    Are we perhaps referring to the LX shorthand for "thru" when selecting channels?
     
  8. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @IsaacKirkwood Sorry! @venuetech had the correct answer in the post before yours from November 17th, 2017.
     
  9. venuetech

    venuetech Well-Known Member

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    That would be the shorthand for a split time notation on a paper cue sheet. First is the time up “/“ time down. Or at least that was the way I learned it, prior to the time of keypad entry.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
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  10. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    While mathematically incorrect, most consoles (and thus LX peeps) use > as thru.
     
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  11. jonliles

    jonliles Active Member Fight Leukemia

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    The Theatre I was in last night still has a slash line with the knife attached at the defacto SM Station. Unfortunately, there is a stuff in the way that would make it difficult to actually get to the slash line. Typical county run facilty. @Footer should be familiar with the Jennie T Anderson from his old job from years ago.
     
  12. venuetech

    venuetech Well-Known Member

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    Makes me wonder when was it last tested.
     
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  13. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @venuetech When it originally opened in the fall of 1973, the Hamilton Place Great Hall was a 2183 seat soft-seater with a slash line; a knife on a chain DSR and a round iron ball at DSL. The knife on the chain was the most used, and probably dullest, knife because EVERYONE used it; carpenters to trim hemp and even 1 x 2's and LX to cut tie lines. The original knife was removed and sharpened a few times but was eventually replaced by a knife with replaceable blades. Like the IA; some call it nepotism, we call it tradition.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard
     
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  14. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    @jonliles @venuetech @Footer @derekleffew @gafftaper @dvsDave @tdtastic While we're chattering away about "slash lines" and knives routinely provided chained conveniently nearby for the purpose of slashing same, how many of you are familiar with the cast iron balls approximately 1.25 to 1.5" in diameter which were commonly found on the free end of the slash line on the opposite side from the slash knife and below the counter-weight carriage for the fire curtain / asbestos / call it what you will?
    If you're familiar with said iron ball, how many times did you have to use it to secure the curtain at its performance trim before you felt fully confident in its ability to do its job AND your ability to wrap it securely in position?
    For bonus points: How many times did you have to stand protectively in front of said cast iron ball during public tours, particularly tours involving children and curious 'touchy feely' back stage types who'd never been in a venue with a grid higher than 16' in their lives?
    I'll be first to admit, every time it took two of us grunting to haul the fire curtain out to its normal high trim and then we secured it with that one quick 'n simple (yet SO easy to quickly release if / when required) wrap, I looked back several times before walking away satisfied it was really that easy and that I'd actually done it correctly.
    EDIT to add a P.S.
    In the case of Hamilton, Ontario's Hamilton Place Great Hall (Opened in the fall of 1973) the slash line and cast iron ball secured the manually operated clutch linking the non-variable speed electric motor's transmission which hoisted and secured the 11,000 pound originally supplied asbestos curtain in position.
    Eighteen years later in the fall of 1991 the exact same technique with the cast iron ball was used to directly secure the more modern fire curtain in Hamilton's Theatre Aquarius / DuMaurier Centre / whatever they're calling it nowadays. Both venues were heavily influenced by a long deceased senior member of IATSE 129 who absolutely INSISTED on having what he felt was the best method ever devised for the purpose. Ivan Munn, father of Butch and Dennis, taught me the ease and reliability of the cast iron ball and I've yet to forget his lesson.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018
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  15. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I totally love your "trompe loiel" and please keep in mind this is coming from a guy who knows less than zero about painting and thinks one of the best uses for a paint brush is adding drag to doors on box sets, just enough so they'll remain wherever preset without blowing in the breeze. I have seen a friend's attempt at a similar "trompe loiel" visual effect painted on the entire floor of his powder room immediately inside his front door to literally startle the excrement out of guests casually walking in in the dark and closing the door prior to turning the light on. He and his wife's floor is designed to appear as if there is no floor and that you're somehow magically standing in mid-air about 20' above the concrete basement floor slab, of course the toilet drain pipe is painted in situ along with ceiling joists, and all the plumbing, electrical, HVAC and cross bracings you'd normally expect to NOT be seeing. I believe there's something similar on line they copied their work from.
    EDIT: Added @JChenault to flag your attention.
    Guard your health.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018
  16. MPowers

    MPowers Well-Known Member

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    [QUOTE="RonHebbard, post: 383730,
    ............If you're familiar with said iron ball, how many times did you have to use it to secure the curtain at its performance trim before you felt fully confident in its ability to do its job AND your ability to wrap it securely in position? ........
    For bonus points: How many times did you have to stand protectively in front of said cast iron ball during public tours, particularly tours involving children and curious 'touchy feely' back stage types........ haul the fire curtain out to its normal high trim and then we secured it with that one quick 'n simple (yet SO easy to quickly release if / when required) wrap,..........

    Loved the Iron ball type. Installed a number of fire curtains with that as the OEM release. When doing repair, gen maintenance etc. I would always replace a knife with a ball release unless the owner refused to allow the change (only happened once).
    Re: protecting the release from curious fingers and hands. I was rarely involved in those type of events during the actual tour, but I always arranged for one or two tour guide "assistants" to open doors just in advance, close them behind the last straggler and to control access to things like curtain releases, doors to trap rooms, stairs to fly gallery, etc.
     

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