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Tool/Toy Use Questions

Discussion in 'Question of the Day' started by ship, Dec 27, 2005.

  1. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    240) What is the safe working load or maximum live load in the basket of a Condor?
    571) What is the approximate proper drilling speed of an 1/8" high speed steel bit in mild steel?
    572) What is the approximate proper drilling speed of an 1/8" high speed steel bit in aluminum?
    573) What size nut uses a 9/16" wrench? What size uses a 11/32" wrench?
    575) A groove of M or #3 on a Nico Press is good for what size oval seeve in wire rope?
    577) Why is using a C-Wrench at its widest setting bad?
    578) Soldering iron tips may become pitted for what reason?
    579) What is the maximum output size of generator which does not require a grounding rod according to the NEC?
    580) Why are tubing cutters not preferred for use with conduit?
    581) The starting current of a gasoline generator can be up to how many times that of the normal running current for small motors?
    582) What is the relationship between pitch diameter and rotational speed on a gear?
    583) To find the driven shaft speed, you should multiply the driving pitch diameter by the speed of the driving shaft and divide or multiply by what?
    584) The alignment of a V belt should be no more than how many inches out of alignment for each 12" of center distance?
    585) When operating a pressurized tank such as an propane tank, what is the standard amount of turns you should open the valve with?
    586) When operating a fork lift on an incline with a load, you should do what?
    587) What two rules for personal safety are required for the operator when operating a fork lift?
    588) What size is the standard phillips screw driver?
    589) What is the best size slotted screw driver blade for a #6 screw?
    590) What part of a drill bit is called the tang?
    591) If your soldering iron tip does not heat up the material well, application of a little A)flux or B) solder to the tip of the iron will aid in transferring the heat to the material.
    592) On a cordless screwdriver, the torque setting is approximately 1.1 inch-pounds per step for 21 steps, given a total of 39 inch pounds max torque, what would the approximate proper setting be for use on a slip plug? Note: the torque is to a #8 brass screw clamping down of #12 AWG stranded wire.
    593) When should you run down the charge on your cordless tool batteries?
    594) What type of charger is best for the battery: a 3 hour charger, a 1 hour charger, or a 15 minute charger? Why?
    595) What is the maximum drill bit diameter of most cordless drills in steel?
    596) Explain the steps and materials involved in using a screw extractor?
    597) How does a clamp-on style amp meter or voltage sniffer work?
    598) When using a C-Wrench, which is the right side of the wrench to be pulled in the direction of the turn, the side with the adjustable jaw, or the side with the large cast fixed jaw?
     
  2. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    A speed of 1500 RPM would be considered to be correct

    A speed of 3750 RPM would be considered to be correct (approximately 2.5 x the speed used for mild steel).

    Note that to correctly calculate the drilling speed, you should take into consideration the desired cutting speed. That is, the speed at which you want to cut (or drill) through the material. Although, this is generally only used for automated drill presses. Depending on the chart that you use, this number ranges from 60 to 110 for mild steel and 100 to 300 for aluminium. The formula is:

    RPM = (320 x cutting speed) / drill diameter. (for inch drills, replace 320 with 4)

    I tend to use a set chart that is based upon drill speeds for mild steel and then a multiplication chart for other materials. This is the most common method for hand operated drills in which the cutting speed is almost directly proportional to the force with which you try to push the drill into the material. Aim is not to push too hard or you will damage the bit.

     
  3. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    3 hour charger

    The shorter the charging time, the more heat generated. The heat from the charging process in addition to degrading the exterior of the battery itself(which can result in premature failure and/or leakage) can also prevent a fire hazard(obviously)
     
  4. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Is this our final answer on the question?
     
  5. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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  6. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    No, I found some info the first time around. The exact opposite is true, the shorter the better.
    http://www.batteryuniversity.com/index.htm
    http://www.batteryuniversity.com/partone-21.htm

    Final answer!
     
  7. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Having not researched it - my initial thought is that given aluminium is a softer metal, less teeth will result in less clogging of the blade given that the speed on most power saws is a constant. Isn't this why fibre cut-off wheels are better suited to ferrous metals than they are to non-ferrous? Also why a file or grinding wheel gets clogged if you use it on aluminium or brass.
     
  8. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Mayhem and I have been carrying on a off line running dialog about the Q of the day answers and other things of late. I'm thinking that what we have been discussing is worth while for some hints or in general knowledge into what we are thinking so I will post it. I will embelish it some in second reading and remove other parts to some extent.

    Also, upon late last night posting the latest serise of questions of the day I noted up to eleven people reading the post yet they were not members in ability to reply. Must eat those that lurk up in not being able to reply for even the simple questions such as salt. Doesn't cost anything to become a member much less post your own candy questions. The purpose of the question of the day is not so much for you as for helping others to learn or challenging thought on a concept. Those that don't post a question are screwing over their fellow tech people. NOT HARD TO THINK UP A QUESTION TO ASK, JUST HARD TO LIMIT YOURSELF I EXPECT IN ASKING SOMETING OF OTHERS ONE IS NOT SURE OF OR IN THINKING THEIR QUESTIONS ARE NOT JUST RIGHT TO BE CHALLENGING OTHERS WITH. Lots of my questions I don't remember or know the answer to. Point is to ask in this format. What do you really loose if wrong for asking questions? What do you loose in your own education by way of not asking?


    (Reply)
    A lot of teeth also generates a lot of heat in cutting aluminum. Often with
    aluminum, it's not just chips clogging up a blade but aluminum melted onto
    the blade. Less teeth equals less heat thus also my thoughts on a slower
    speed for cutting aluminum with a drill bit. This especially if cutting dry or even with a
    other than acceptable for aluminum cutting oil.

    Yep, it does say 2.5, but I disagree with this especially
    if lubricant is not used. Seen way too many bits after a few holes get
    melted aluminum all over their surface even today with a step bit because they went too fast of a feed. I
    think that the better solution would be to invert the 2.5 speed. Books say
    yes, I say no.

    Three phase or two phase is more efficient and gives the motor more power.
    That answers the first part of the question. Second part was also something
    you would be able to answer. Lets say if you have a 230v tool and in
    metering out the outlet, you only are seeing 190v. Is this good for the
    motor?

    Salt question was a curious one ha? Have to throw in the off the wall ones every once in a while. I have a curious mind much less the question of rust went somewhere interesting. Could do an entire forum section on Woman questions.

    Foam molding is more there for inspiration. Not many people do it but it's
    a very cheap and effective way of making molding once one understands how to do so. Amazing what you can create out of a sheet of 2" thick foam given a table saw and variable speed router.

    Wording of the miter box cut angle. Instead of a 90 degree corner, you have
    one for a box set that is 45 degrees. It makes the question less than one
    that is text book regurgitating in those able to answer from book what one needs for a 90 degree corner into those able to answer what is need by way of understanding the principals of doing so. To answer this question, one must not only know the text book but also understand the formula. This or at least find the table for doing so.

    One would think it's that simple to cut a piece of cornice molding, but
    remember that as opposed to the ceiling, this molding is laying on the cut
    off saw and it's instead a lot of inverse angles and compound miters, much
    less you are only cutting half that provided angle. Used to be able to do
    this, I would hope any stage carpenter worth his salt knows how to do it,
    but most don't. Good thing to master if that's your career. In reality its
    complex to do cornice cuts much less make them right, but fairly easy once the method is known.

    Otherwise in Norm or is that "Tommy" style after the
    cut, one saws away the extra material that won't be seen so that if your
    joint is not perfect, the flange of not seen material between pieces won't
    get in the way of a tight joint. Another solution and often a better one is
    not to use the saw. Instead install the first piece going from wall to
    wall. Than take a compass and scribe a piece to be used and in sitting at
    the angle for the profile of the cut. This way it butts up against the
    non-compound miter board very tightly.

    Hmm, pitch of teeth... much less how many x_____ that saw blade has...
    Waxing is often good, otherwise what is coating the blade and gumming it up
    perhaps might be a good thing to look at for a secondary cause. This
    question was all about the saw blade.


    I will be posting these hints.

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Mayhem
    To: Ship
    Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 6:33 PM
    Subject: Re: So - what is it that you actually do?


    > Entered my guess:
    >
    > Having not researched it - my initial thought is that given aluminium is a
    > softer metal, less teeth will result in less clogging of the blade given
    > that the speed on most power saws is a constant. Isn't this why fibre
    > cut-off wheels are better suited to ferrous metals than they are to
    > non-ferrous? Also why a file or grinding wheel gets clogged if you use it
    > on aluminium or brass.
    >
    > Interesting salt question but I couldn't answer the drill wiring one as I
    > have never seen a 2 phase motor before, as we only have (had) 2 phase for
    > ovens or possibly hot water systems but both of which are now single phase
    > in most instances. So for power it is either 240V single phase or 415V
    > three phase. I know that a 3 phase motor is more efficient to run than a
    > single one but not sure how this would translate to your side of the
    > world.
    >
    > Have no idea on the cornice moulds from foam - way out of my experience
    > but the miter saw question confused me. A cornice to me is the decorative
    > thing that you place between the top of the wall and the ceiling.
    > Therefore, 2 of its three faces are flat and perpendicular to one another.
    > Thus, to cut it at 130' in a mitre saw to form a corner you simply
    > position the blade at 45' to the opposite side of the table to the length
    > of cornice you are cutting the corner into. That is that if you have the
    > section of cornice to hang on the left of the blade, you swing the blade
    > 45' to the right, so that the angle from the back of the cornice to the
    > face of the blade is 135'.
    >
    > However, I am not sure if that is what you are asking based on how the
    > question was worded.
    >
    > I did however like the kit that thought you were cutting through your saw
    > horse in addition to the 3/4" ply! Initial thought form me was to check
    > that the pitch of the teeth on the blade and to wax it.
    >
    >
    >>My memory than is incorrect. See the reply post as to what remains the
    >>question given it.
    >>
    >>----- Original Message ----- From: Mayhem
    >>To: Ship
    >>Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 1:55 AM
    >>Subject: Re: So - what is it that you actually do?
    >>
    >> (VAKC_DrillingMaterials.pdf) from the Vermont American website.

    >>>Based upon the chart that I use and all the other sources that I checked
    >>>yes. Based upon some of the variables cited, the drilling speed for a
    >>>1/8"
    >>>drill in Aluminium was as high as 8000RPM. Attached is the chart that I
    >>>have printed out and in my workshop (I have converted the inch drill
    >>>sized
    >>>to metric on the hardcopy).
    >>>
     
  9. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Lunch time here and doing a little bit of looking into the cutting speeds etc. Found this in relation to milling but seemd to line up with the other things I have read:

    "First of all, the amount of power needed for working the lighter metals is much less than with cast irons or steels. Secondly, metal removal rates can increase substantially. Surface feet per minute (sfm) values are much higher than with heavy metals (up to 1200 SFM with uncoated carbide). The exception to this rule is magnesium."

    Thus it would seem that it is the hardness of the material that becomes the factor.
     
  10. Radman

    Radman Well-Known Member

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    Short on time, so without looking here's a few:

    587) What two rules for personal safety are required for the operator when operating a fork lift?

    Safety belt (seat belt) and... maybe hardhat, but I'm not sure...


    593) When should you run down the charge on your cordless tool batteries?

    Before you charge them.


    591) If your soldering iron tip does not heat up the material well, application of a little A)flux or B) solder to the tip of the iron will aid in transferring the heat to the material.

    B
     
  11. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Actually not all that common to find flux as a separate item as most solders these days have a flux core. Flux is used to clean the surfaces of the materials to be soldered in ensuring a good quality joint. If you have one of the old style “lump” irons that are either heated up in an open fire or by an oyx/acetylene torch, then you would use flux to clean the tip and the material to be soldered.

    When soldering, applying a small amount of solder to the tip helps with the distribution of heat into the material being soldered. If you were to magnify to interaction between the soldering iron tip and the work, you would see gaps where the surfaces don’t necessarily join up. The solder will fill these gaps up and act as a conduit through which the material can heat up. If you ever desolder a lead from a plug, this will make the job a lot easier.
     
  12. AVGuyAndy

    AVGuyAndy Active Member

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    Don't make me get out Machinery's Handbook...
     
  13. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    One of the aims of this discussion!
     
  14. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Check your tool's manual to see what it says. Anyone else read your tool's manual?
     
  15. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    I have been all over version #26 and not finding much support to the why part of the question.
     
  16. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Had meant to add this additional off line discussion between Ship and I some time ago but forgot to. For those interested, this is as far as we got:

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Ship
    To: Mayhem

    So what does this mean to you in speed? To me this means that a drill bit going faster removes the cut material from the surface faster, but on the other hand is assumed to create a bit more heat. So in doing surface feet per minute values, one would assume that the more teeth or in a higher drilling speed it removes the waste faster.

    This in part is the main part of the question given what's removed might just melt to the surface instead of being removed. Imagine the 1/8" drill bit with a what was it 8,000 RPM speed. That's a wee bit fast even without facts and figures one might assume.

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Mayhem
    To: Ship

    But given the fact that softer metals heat up quicker, isn't that heat dissipated faster? In thinking of it in terms of hardness of the material I am thinking that the wear on the tool is greater on the harder material. Softer materials will also be more susceptible to damage through ripping and increasing the speed would protect against this to some extent. Thus, a slower, steadier speed is best suited for hard metals. Another thing that comes up is the need to remove the waste material and this would tend to support your statement of needing fewer teeth on the blade. The chips produced would melt quicker given their small size and inability to dissipate the heat as effectively as a larger piece. I would imagine it is the waste that melts and clogs things up.

    Is there a difference in the techniques use for drilling and machining as opposed to that of cutting? A saw blade has a larger surface area than the cutting faces of a drill or chisel, and isn't in constant contact with the material. Is it possible that this could be a factor?

    More teeth also means a cleaner cut, which would make sense in a soft metal that could otherwise rip and tear.

    Just some random thoughts given what I have managed to find (which wasn't much).

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Ship
    To: Mayhem

    Yep, the slower the speed, the more rough the cut by way of tearing at some point as opposed to cutting. A 10tpi blade will also to some extent cut thru the 1/8" plate, but wear out much faster than that of a 14tpi blade. This on a similar ratio to that of a 18 tpi blade.

    On the other hand, with the faster drilling speed thus chip removal speed you mention the melting of the smaller chips - to the surface of the cutting blade or that of perhaps the walls of the drill bit and it's chip clearing surfaces. Thus in random thoughts a part of the cause of aluminum gumming up the works to some extent.
    Cutting surfaces are a factor but related. A 1/8" drill bit say has two teeth but they are 1/6" wide. That of a saw blade is say only 5/64" wide but spread across say six or ten teeth of cutting edge for a plate. This a factor of stroke length of the cutting tool, but also even if band saw, for the most part the same blades of use.

    The saw blade has a much smaller surface area than a drill bit and instead more teeth. Should be a factor but related.

    Before consulting the book on my desk, we are getting far in theorizing. Too bad it's not on line as if others would contribute their thoughts.
     

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