Triaxial Loading

Discussion in 'Question of the Day' started by dvsDave, Aug 22, 2019.

  1. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

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    @josh88 and @RonHebbard and everybody else: sorry to be a bit of a ghost. We're on a big training compliance push around here. Anyhoo…..
    Josh pretty much nails it, and since I have a thing for Black Diamond gear, here's some great stuff regarding what triaxial loading is, what it does to carabiners (yep, it's baaaaad).
    https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/qc-lab-off-axis-tri-axial-carabiner-loading.html
    From the page linked above:

    Bottom Line:

    "In general, climbing gear is pretty robust, but that statement holds more true when the gear is used as designed and in typical loading scenarios. Once you start to stray off from ideal use (ie. off-axis loading, tri-axial loading, quad-axis loading), then you can see the ultimate strength reduced, even to the point, as in a nose-hooked scenario, where things become super sketchy.

    So the bottom line is that you need to keep carabiners lined up along the major axis and try not to allow for multi-directional loading of carabiners, because it compromises their strength. "


    Now, as for where we encounter this:
    Lots of times, in my own anecdotal experience, in recreational climbing scenarios. In other words, folks who just don't know.
    In terms of business, and again in my own anecdotal (and what I've heard from other friends who work in the air), mostly with aerialists with little to no training- or just enough to be dangerous. Truly, want make yourself crazy? Go jump into the "aerialist safety" type groups on the Book of Face. We also see this with more inexperienced riggers trying to cram a whole lot of stuff into too little space.
    Do some reading- manuals and catalogues and websites will tell you all kinds of stuff you never knew you never knew. (For those of you who have been around, you'll recognize the acronym: RTFM)

    How do we mitigate this stuff? Training! Always share knowledge to make others better. But make SURE you know what you're talking about. If you can train nothing else, train people to say "stop" when there is question or doubt. Sometimes it's hard to train courage to people for things like this, but it's totally okay to raise a concern and find out your fears were unfounded. Know why? Because if you say nothing, and someone is injured/dies or millions of dollars of gear crash down- how you gonna feel about yourself after that?

    Now, the rest of the mighty CB should jump in here and call out what I missed. Seriously, go! :grin:
     
  2. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member

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  3. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member

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  4. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

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    Thanks, Bill! Somedays I just bang my head on the keyboard to see how many keys I can hit at once. Somedays I do actual things.
    -Brian
     
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  5. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member

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  6. TimMc

    TimMc Well-Known Member

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  7. Michael K

    Michael K Active Member

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    To follow up Tim's question, what is/are the proper methods for situations that require tri/quad-axial loading? Should a shackle be used in place of the carabiner? Some sort of pear, round, or other shaped ring?
     
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  8. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

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    Sure is. But pear rings are built for that. Carabiners, definitely not.

    As for shackles, we're talking as in making legs to a shackle? Watch out for that bridle angle that you don't go past the capacity of the shackle.
     
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