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VL2000

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by Charc, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, it's so late I'll be falling asleep in 30 seconds, I just wanted to get the ball rolling on this though:

    VL2000, a "designed for theatre ML"? Quieter, etc. than it's brethren and competition?
     
  2. Pie4Weebl

    Pie4Weebl Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I take it you are really talking about the VL1000, or VL1000TSD (tungsten, shutters, onboard dimmer) if you wanna be picky?

    And to answer your question, yes it is an amazing fixture for theatre use, runs circles around S4 Revolutions at about the same cost. I used 8 of them on a production of Urine Town last year and even peter sargent was really impressed by them. Great fixtures all around!
     
  3. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    But if you really mean VL2000, and you have to specify Spot or Wash, but we'll assume Spot: A big NO! Not a bad light, but just an updated version of the VL6c, and no color mixing. And if a moving light can't blend with the conventional lights (SourceFours) it's not going to be very useful in a theatre design.

    As Pie said, the
    VL1000TSD is a nice light (though i've only used the arc version: VL1000AS) and it and the ETC Revolution are the only two in their class. Arguing about which is better would be like arguing Kliegl vs. Century in the day. But I would go with the V*L over the Revolution, due to the color mixing. Both are huge, clunky, and slow, but so am I and that's okay for theatrical usage.
     
  4. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Nope I meant VL2000. ME at internship was talking about the idea on the table of purchasing MLs. He mentioned the VL2000 to be the "made for theatre light". I didn't want to be a prick, so I offhandedly asked if he'd looked into the VL1000, with the tungsten source. He then said "yep, I looked into all of 'em, considered the VL1000, VL2000 and VL3000, but the VL2000 is really a theatre light".

    It seems to me like VL1000 is the clear winner: tungsten, iris or shutters, CMY, other awesome options; but I left the subject alone. Don't want to be burning any bridges...
     
  5. TimMiller

    TimMiller Well-Known Member

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    the robe1200at's are a great theatre light. Very nice mirrored light is a martin pal. Its a big monster though, but it has framing and color mixing.
     
  6. DaveySimps

    DaveySimps CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    We rent the VL1000TS's from time to time for musicals. I love them. They are very versitile, and not noisy at all. I great moving fixture for theatre applications.

    ~Dave
     
  7. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    To the best of my knowledge, the VL2000 isn't even made any more - it's VL2500 spot and wash now. If he's looking for a made-for-theatre light it's the VL1000 with CMY and framing and the choice of arc or tungsten models.
     
  8. SerraAva

    SerraAva Active Member

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    You are corrected soundlight. VL2000 production has stopped. The VL2000 and VL2500 look the same externally, but internally, the VL2500 Spot added CMY, and both the wash and spot received a glass dimmer wheel for dimming instead of the flags used in the VL2000. It’s a more linear way of dimming compared to flags. Problem is, it came at a cost of 500 lumens and lost some zoom range on the wash, 14-55 vs. 12-57.
     

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