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ETC Source ellipsoidal ventilation

Cineruss

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2019
Location
Los angeles, ca
I have some etc source 4 ellipisoidals i am going to have to mount with the yoke up placing the instrument about a foot from the ceiling. I was just curious if anyone knew of the ventilation requirements for these ellipisoidals.. there is plenty of room on the sides..just the ceiling concern.
 

RonHebbard

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Location
Waterdown, ON, CA
Just be sure none end up under a fire sprinkler(!)
@Michael K You're reminding me of my high school. The school was built in the early 1900's sans fire sprinklers and / or smoke or rate of rise detectors.

While I was a student, our Board Of Education hired a non-union team of electrical workers to install rate of rise detectors throughout the school The workers were a pair of young guys with their sons and worked overnight.
Our auditorium sat 1,104 on two levels. At the rear of the balcony was a VERY small projection booth barely large enough to accommodate two 16 mm projectors and one 1,500 Watt incandescent follow spot. A standard, low rate of rise detector was installed on the booth's ceiling directly over the end of the follow spot housing the 1,500 watt DTJ lamp.
Guess which detector went off the first time we had a rental and used our follow spot?
The second detector to go off was in the teachers' staff lounge where another standard rate of rise detector was mounted directly over a small table supporting a dual element hot-plate, a toaster, an electric kettle and an electric frying pan.

To his credit, our senior electrical teacher toured all of his classes around the building pointing out these two detectors in particular along with a third over a hot plate in the chief custodian's room.
There are so many things to be learned in school, including many not included on the curriculum.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 
Last edited:

Cineruss

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2019
Location
Los angeles, ca
@Michael K You're reminding me of my high school. The school was built in the early 1900's sans fire sprinklers and / or smoke or rate of rise detectors.

While I was a student, our Board Of Education hired non-union team of electrical workers to install rate of rise detectors throughout the school The workers were a pair of young guys with their sons and worked overnight.
Our auditorium sat 1,104 on two levels. At the rear of the balcony was a VERY small projection booth barely large enough to accommodate two 16 mm projectors and one 1,500 Watt incandescent follow spot. A standard. low rate of rise detector was installed on the booth's ceiling directly over the end of the follow spot housing the 1,500 watt DTJ lamp.
Guess which detector went off the first time we had a rental and used our follow spot?
The second detector to go off was in the teachers' staff lounge where another standard rate of rise detector was mounted directly over a small table supporting a dual element hot-plate, a toaster, an electric kettle and an electric frying pan.

To his credit, our senior electrical teacher toured all of his classes around the building pointing out these two detectors in particular along with a third over a hot plate in the chief custodian's room.
There are so many things to be learned in school, including many not included on the curriculum.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
LOL thats a good one. I have one similar where I was working in a community college designing a light show and the building and lighting was OLD. I mean ancient. The lighting of course was super hot since the lamps used extreme wattage. The director asked the maintenance department to add fans to the building since the AC was not working that well. So in all their wisdom, the maintenance depart buys those cheap walmart fans and places them in the catwalk facing the audience. Well guess what was in its paths...lights. So it blew the heat down into the audience and the force of the wind was shaking the lights and gel holders and making for some interesting light effects on the stage.
 

RonHebbard

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Location
Waterdown, ON, CA
LOL thats a good one. I have one similar where I was working in a community college designing a light show and the building and lighting was OLD. I mean ancient. The lighting of course was super hot since the lamps used extreme wattage. The director asked the maintenance department to add fans to the building since the AC was not working that well. So in all their wisdom, the maintenance depart buys those cheap walmart fans and places them in the catwalk facing the audience. Well guess what was in its paths...lights. So it blew the heat down into the audience and the force of the wind was shaking the lights and gel holders and making for some interesting light effects on the stage.
@Cineruss While we're veering off into oddities of buildings, their designers and their maintenance folk:
In Hamilton, Ontario Theatre Aquarius is the smaller of the producing theatres. The auditorium was heated and / or cooled by three, roof-mounted, HVAC units; one for the balcony, another for under the balcony and the third for the remainder of the main floor.
Two problems: The founding Artistic Director would only run the A/C for performances when a paying audience was anticipated. All day the sun would beat down on the roof plus we'd be using the lighting for rehearsals. At approximately 6:00 p.m., Peter would turn all three A/C units on full blast intent on cooling the auditorium by half hour. The HVAC units were on the roof, their distribution ducts were immediately below the roof. The ducts were round and Peter had the design engineers go with noisy uninsulated / single wall ducts to minimize costs.
The auditorium got warm all day with the heat rising to the roof. Peter'd turn on the HVAC units, the chilled air would enter the ducts, all of the exterior surfaces of all the ducts would sweat; being round, gravity would pull all of the sweat to the lowest point where rain would drip off the bottoms and several rows of seats got wet, nicely in time for the arrival of patrons.
Also due to Peter insisting on holding costs down, the three HVAC units were not coordinated. Every now and again one of the units would sense the auditorium was getting cold, kick into heating, and do its level best to heat the entire auditorium leading to two thirds of the auditorium getting chilled and one third perspiring like crazy. NOTE: Gentleman sweat while ladies perspire; ladies NEVER sweat.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 

Cineruss

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2019
Location
Los angeles, ca
@Cineruss While we're veering off into oddities of buildings, their designers and their maintenance folk:
In Hamilton, Ontario Theatre Aquarius is the smaller of the producing theatres. The auditorium was heated and / or cooled by three, roof-mounted, HVAC units; one for the balcony, another for under the balcony and the third for the remainder of the main floor.
Two problems: The founding Artistic Director would only run the A/C for performances when a paying audience was anticipated. All day the sun would beat down on the roof plus we'd be using the lighting for rehearsals. At approximately 6:00 p.m., Peter would turn all three A/C units on full blast intent on cooling the auditorium by half hour. The HVAC units were on the roof, their distribution ducts were immediately below the roof. The ducts were round and Peter had the design engineers go with noisy uninsulated / single wall ducts to minimize costs.
The auditorium got warm all day with the heat rising to the roof. Peter'd turn on the HVAC units, the chilled air would enter the ducts, all of the exterior surfaces of all the ducts would sweat; being round, gravity would pull all of the sweat to the lowest point where rain would drip off the bottoms and several rows of seats got wet, nicely in time for the arrival of patrons.
Also due to Peter insisting on holding costs down, the three HVAC units were not coordinated. Every now and again one of the units would sense the auditorium was getting cold, kick into heating, and do its level best to heat the entire auditorium leading to two thirds of the auditorium getting chilled and one third perspiring like crazy. NOTE: Gentleman sweat while ladies perspire; ladies NEVER sweat.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
LOL LOL I was laughing throughout it all. I can imagine what that was like. The crazy things people will do.