Missed university deadline, need a place to study at

Joined
Dec 2, 2018
Location
Russia
This year i'm finishing school and as ia have four years of working as a light technician in theatre and cinema with many, i'd like to continue to develop by entering a university. Nevertheless, it seems like I've missed all the BA progremms deadline for this year (september). So right now i'm looking for any courses that last a year or more, interships or anything like that in theatre technician area.
 

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Nov 24, 2005
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Saratoga Springs, NY
There are plenty of schools in the US that are still accepting applications... and with enrollment in higher ed way down you won't have too much problem getting into a program.
 

Amiers

Renting to Corporate One Fixture at a Time.
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Phoenix, Az
Go work in an AV shop. If that’s a thing in Russia.
 
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Joined
Dec 2, 2018
Location
Russia
There are plenty of schools in the US that are still accepting applications... and with enrollment in higher ed way down you won't have too much problem getting into a program.
They all cost like 30000-40000$ a year, which is not an option for me. If you have any examples, which are not, it would be great if you tell me.
 

icewolf08

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Jan 11, 2007
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Lititz, PA
That would be great, but what foreign company would hire an 18-year-old with no education from Russia? I'm not sarcastic, if you know such, let me know.
While I have no idea what it would take to get a work visa for the US, I can tell you that TAIT is hiring for entry level positions in a new role at the shop, "Integration Technician." We are looking to bring in people to help with shop assembly of shows. It is a position where people should be able to learn a lot and either grow into new positions in the company or move on to other endeavors in the industry. You can get a full description of the job on our website and we are still accepting applications.
 

Colin

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Jan 23, 2015
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Eastern Massachusetts
I teach at a very expensive private college in the US, and I don't advocate that expense for anyone unless they have a well-developed reason for the undertaking. Can you explain why the college/university environment is attractive to you as opposed to gaining work experience? Like others have said, entry level professional work can sometimes be the best option. No debt, and you're making professional connections and learning a professional model right away. I'm sure being a foreigner adds all sorts of complications I know nothing about. If you can get to the US on a work visa then perhaps you can find some affordable classes to take part time once you get here, and then you'll have access to support services at that school to help you locate, compare and pay for a full degree program later on.
 
Joined
Dec 2, 2018
Location
Russia
While I have no idea what it would take to get a work visa for the US, I can tell you that TAIT is hiring for entry level positions in a new role at the shop, "Integration Technician." We are looking to bring in people to help with shop assembly of shows. It is a position where people should be able to learn a lot and either grow into new positions in the company or move on to other endeavors in the industry. You can get a full description of the job on our website and we are still accepting applications.
That looks like exactly what I am searching for, thanks a lot. I will take a more serious look in the evening.
 
Joined
Dec 2, 2018
Location
Russia
I teach at a very expensive private college in the US, and I don't advocate that expense for anyone unless they have a well-developed reason for the undertaking. Can you explain why the college/university environment is attractive to you as opposed to gaining work experience? Like others have said, entry level professional work can sometimes be the best option. No debt, and you're making professional connections and learning a professional model right away. I'm sure being a foreigner adds all sorts of complications I know nothing about. If you can get to the US on a work visa then perhaps you can find some affordable classes to take part time once you get here, and then you'll have access to support services at that school to help you locate, compare and pay for a full degree program later on.
I guess it's more about kind of a template, that exists in Russia. School-university-work. And as I've read, immigration through education is the easiest way of doing it. However, I can see your point. Probably it would really be better for me to find a job, to get experience. The only question is where))
 

Amiers

Renting to Corporate One Fixture at a Time.
Joined
May 28, 2009
Location
Phoenix, Az
With the way immigration is going I wish you the best of luck getting a work visa over here right now.
 
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SteveB

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Joined
Mar 20, 2004
Location
Brooklyn, NY
The biggest stumbling block to getting work is the visa. Like a lot of countries, the attitude of US Imigration is there’s no reason for a company to be hiring a non-US citizen when they can hire a citizen. Thus a company that really wants you needs to justify why you are needed and why a US citizen is less qualified. When you have no education or particular skill set, that’s a hard sell. Possibly lower paid interneships are easier to get, the hiring company would know better, especially if they’ve done this prior.

What I see typically at my college is students getting either a Bachelor or Masters degree, for which they can get a student visa to stay in the US for 3 or 4 years, then attempting to move to a full time paid position, where the company was able to justify their hiring. I know of one Korean MFA graduate who was able to do that (she’s now a stage manager for a well know dance company) but another MFA student was unable and had to return to Korea. Others have gotten married while here, having met a US citizen and stayed through that method. Note that typically and as student, there are restrictions placed on the student in terms of how much work they can take on. Thus it can be hard to make a living while going to school.
 
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RonHebbard

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Jun 12, 2004
Location
Waterdown, ON, CA
The biggest stumbling block to getting work is the visa. Like a lot of countries, the attitude of US Imigration is there’s no reason for a company to be hiring a non-US citizen when they can hire a citizen. Thus a company that really wants you needs to justify why you are needed and why a US citizen is less qualified. When you have no education or particular skill set, that’s a hard sell. Possibly lower paid interneships are easier to get, the hiring company would know better, especially if they’ve done this prior.

What I see typically at my college is students getting either a Bachelor or Masters degree, for which they can get a student visa to stay in the US for 3 or 4 years, then attempting to move to a full time paid position, where the company was able to justify their hiring. I know of one Korean MFA graduate who was able to do that (she’s now a stage manager for a well know dance company) but another MFA student was unable and had to return to Korea. Others have gotten married while here, having met a US citizen and stayed through that method. Note that typically and as student, there are restrictions placed on the student in terms of how much work they can take on. Thus it can be hard to make a living while going to school.
@SteveB and @Benjamin Vetluzhskikh If Ben can over & under 30 Metre cables from mic cable to 4/0 feeder he'd have more marketable skills than many Americans, probably better than Donald.
Posting from north of Donald's walls.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 

ruinexplorer

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I would recommend looking at production companies in Russia, even though, as you say, that isn't the normal path to employment. It may mean that you take a position other than what you are hoping to get. I'm sure that in many ways, hiring practices mimic the way they are done around the world. In this particular business, it is often who you know. Getting in, even at a position other than what you want, and showing that you are a good worker and willing to learn can often get you to where you want to be.

If you want out of Russia, and you can't afford to pay to be a student, you might be out of luck for a while. Do you have family out of the country? You might be able to get a non-work visa and get volunteer experience (it has to be clear that you are not taking work away from citizens).
 
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Joined
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I would recommend looking at production companies in Russia, even though, as you say, that isn't the normal path to employment. It may mean that you take a position other than what you are hoping to get. I'm sure that in many ways, hiring practices mimic the way they are done around the world. In this particular business, it is often who you know. Getting in, even at a position other than what you want, and showing that you are a good worker and willing to learn can often get you to where you want to be.

If you want out of Russia, and you can't afford to pay to be a student, you might be out of luck for a while. Do you have family out of the country? You might be able to get a non-work visa and get volunteer experience (it has to be clear that you are not taking work away from citizens).
Working in Russia isn't an option for me, as I will be taken to army if I don't enter university, or leave the country. Also russian employment system is about formal education, if we speak about at least a bit serious production companies.
Speaking about countries, I don't consider only US companies, which are, as was abovementioned, difficult to get a place at. New Zealand, Australia and other English-speaking countries, who are likely to welcome migrates, will be also ok for me. Right now my goal is to be out of Russia and to be doing something connected with my future profession either working or studying.