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Splicing Gel

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by DHSLXOP, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. DHSLXOP

    DHSLXOP Active Member

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    Hi Everyone,

    Quick question - I found a couple pieces of gel in the cabinet today that I wanted to tape together. I used some masking tape to do it, but I'm not really sure if that burns when its put in a fixture. If not masking tape, what would be the proper procedure to do this? Thanks
     
  2. DarSax

    DarSax Active Member

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    Masking tape wouldn't be what you're looking for--if it's not unsafe (which it may well be), it's certainly going to lessen your output.

    You can find clear gel (high-heat) tape out there specifically for this purpose. I'd bet someone like City Theatrical makes it. Lemme take a look.

    To reiterate: no good!

    edit: I was wrong, they just do blacktak. Here's rosebrand's stuff. http://www.rosebrand.com/product870/A+E-J-Lar-910-Tape.aspx?cid=206&idx=885&tid=1&info=Specialty
     
  3. DaveySimps

    DaveySimps CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Masking tape = all bad, definately not the way to go. BMI Supply sells gel tape just for this purpose. It is only about $5 for a roll.

    ~Dave
     
  4. kiilljoy

    kiilljoy Member

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    I didn't know such a thing existed. I've always just seen scotch tape, with apparently no ill effects.
     
  5. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Are you talking about sandwiching or splicing? On modern gels, I would just overlap them a bit and use the frame to hold them in place. Gel tape is best if you have it handy. Nothing is going to look pretty if it is in view, but out of view, I would just overlay it a bit. (Unless its a scoop or something very large.)
     
  6. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I've found that any good quality clear 2" cello tape performs acceptably. Here's some from a specialty company, but product from your local office supply store should work just fine.

    Especially with gobos, experiment with two different colors, the splice running diagonally, or a checkerboard pattern of four squares. Or my favorite trick, learned from Tom Skelton, a saturated color donut.

    Now, if I were making my own gelstrings for scrollers--since it's such a labor intensive process, I would use the J-Lar 910, or manufacturer-recommended tape.

    Any non-transparent tape is a definite no-no.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2008
  7. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    I've used scotch tape quite a bit with no problems. I don't like the "magic tape" style... the kind that looks milky but turns invisible. I prefer the "transparent tape" it's more like clear plastic. Never had a problem with it melting or losing it's stick power.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2008
  8. Brilliant2007

    Brilliant2007 Member

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    I have been using Scotch tape for many many years and have never had a problem. I've used it for taping color together...making split frames...and even custom scrolls. I've never had a problem...EVER!!
     
  9. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    I use clear packing tape. It's cheap, and you can get it everywhere. I have never had any issues with it in terms of melting or burning.
     
  10. Grog12

    Grog12 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Wow...Little did I know that I was in the minority about taping gel together...waste of time and money IMHO.

    And for the record Color Doughnuts 4tw!

    When using a multiple color gel I usually find the newest frame available and let that pinch the gel into place. Three diagonal stripes of the primarys vs a gobo rotator with dots is pretty nifty.
     
  11. dpeterle

    dpeterle Member

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    Fusing gels

    Hello, I was wondering if there is a way to fuse two gels together. (e.g., if I wanted a 7" gel frame with half R#42 and R#80)

    Thanks!
     
  12. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Re: Fusing gels

    Plain old clear scotch tape usually works just fine. Many theatrical dealers carry "splicing tape" that works well too. It is more aimed at building scrolls for color scrollers.
     
  13. avkid6345

    avkid6345 Member

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    Re: Fusing gels

    I'm kind of confused on what you want. You can't exactly "fuse" gels together. If you tried melting them, the color saturation and thickness would be uneven, producing less than desirable results.

    I'd cut both sheets to fit the 7" frame. You can then cut both sheets (in half or however you'd like) symmetrically, and tape them together so that the two cut sheets make up one 7" sheet. The light coming out would be more or less half blue mixing to half red (depending on the focus and fixture). I would imagine the effect would be more profound with a leko versus a fresnel or other floodlight.
    If you want a mixture of the two colors, the best thing to do is to look through your swatch book for an "in-between" color, or if your really in a pinch, cut tight zigzags with each gel so that the two pieces fit together like teeth.

    How long would you need this filter to last?
     
  14. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Re: Fusing gels

    We mere mortals can't, but the magical Hoosier elves at Apollo can:
     
  15. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Re: Fusing gels

    Clear 1" Silicone #F-M815-1x72-c 1" Clear Polyester silicone splicing Heat Tape (1" J-Lar Clear)
    Permacel #910 1" J-Lar Gel Repair Tape 1"x72yd, 2"x72yd

    Either above as products in probably the same only definition are preferred for taking the heat. Just lock them up or techie's will be using the J-Lar for covering colored marking stripes on cable. J-Lar as it's called is not something to be out on the floor for general use given it's cost. It is proper stuff for mostly rated as good as your gel for taping them together.

    P.S. anyone that supplies tape or theatrical supplier can supply such a product given the descriptions above of it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2012
  16. Kelite

    Kelite Apollo Staff Premium Member

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    Re: Fusing gels

    My my my, Derek- what a fantastic memory you have! Not only did you get the technical side of the welded string info, but you remembered that it's the Apollo elves who make uncommonly good lighting toys.

    Kudos to you! :clap:
     
  17. Zel

    Zel Member

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    Re: Fusing gels

    I use 3m gel splicing tape and never had a problem, but try this trick; take two gels of different color (say magenta and blue) and splice them together. Then use a breakup gobo and see what you find. The knife edge diffraction properties of the light going through the gobo breaks up the spectrum enough to give a pretty cool effect of color shading. Change up colors and percentages to get the effect you want :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2012

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