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Par 64 reflector with dys lamp?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by tweetersaway, Jun 13, 2008.

  1. tweetersaway

    tweetersaway Member

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    Have any of you used a PAR 64's with the kit and DYS lamps? If so, what sort of angle do you get? Is it just really diffused, or is it relatively focused? I've been trying to find any technical information about it and have failed. Any help is appreciated. Thanks:)
     
  2. SerraAva

    SerraAva Active Member

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    The DYS kit for the Par 64s turn them into very narrow spots. As for a reflector with the DYS kit, I don't of of anything of the sort to get more spread. Par 64 lamps get there spread from the lenses being on the lamps themselves. DYS has no lens on it.
     
  3. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Raylights they are called. Raylight reflector kits they are. Normally such a thing is simlar to a beam projector but more simple for a tight flash light like beam of light. Such a concept is available in 300w, 600w and 800w. Rock and roll baby in a simlar to VNSP beam of light but one also different.

    On that whole that's what it is a lamp in a reflector as similar to a PAR lamp, but one of higher output (shorter life) but also one of limited lamp life. Different beam feel to it.

    Beyond this norm, believe American DJ now offers ray light lamp kits of various beam spreads. STill and overall even if a great lamp type, not very cost effective.
     
  4. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Yes, Raylights, invented by Doug Ray, the old LD for the Hooters and an old client of mine in 1982. He swore by them (of course) but I never warmed up to them. The beams might be looked at as an NSP with a bit of a frost. The original ones, built around reflectors bought from Edmund Scientific had a very sharp focus, much like an ACL, but once they went into mass production, a much cheaper reflector was used. Never say never! Yes, Doug, after 26 years I find myself using your invention! They are available in PAR 56, and 64, and the one thing they can't be beat on is weight. I have a couple of 56 bars with 4 lights on them. Cans are aluminum. You can pick the whole bar up with one finger! (great for low ceiling clubs.) Now, for the down side. As they are open reflectors they get dirty. Also, the lamps have a shorter life. But, the reflector/adapter can be had for about $6, and the 600 w DYS is about $6 as well.
     
  5. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    Seriously, JD? That's pretty cool.
     
  6. bmiller025

    bmiller025 Member

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    Sorry to resurrect this discussion, but I have a question about these units. I am reconfiguring a terribly inaccessible lighting grid in a school auditorium, and there are a bunch of these instruments (manufactured by Chauvet) up there, all of which have blown lamps in them. With the rated life of a DYS at around 80 hours, I am wondering if it is possible to put in an FMR (with a rated life of 2000 hours) instead. They are both 600W/120V, but the DYS seems to have a different filament configuration than the FMR. The goal is to only have to rip out seats and relamp the set-up once per year or (gasp) two.
     
  7. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    More important than the filament configuration, the LCL of the DYS is 1.437", vs. the FMR's 2.000". Yes, the FMR's base will fit in the socket, and light will come out the front end, but don't expect it to be focused or resemble anything of an even beam (which it may not have even with the DYS). I'd replace or retrofit the fixtures to take true PAR64 lamps.

    I hear they're also making RGB LED PARs now so you wouldn't have to access them for the next 50,000 hours, and could even remotely change colors.;)
     
  8. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Mar 16, 2011
  9. smigit2002

    smigit2002 Member

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    I've use them, and have a number of the in installations.
    The lamp life is a real killer, but at least the lamps are small enough that storage is never an issue!
    We have a few reflectors that I would consider "mediums," which basically have diffusing bumps along the reflectors. It works pretty well, but you're still looking at a short lifespan for the lamps.

    As for replacing with par lamps, maybe it was just the run of reflectors that I got, but I've noticed that once they are plugged into a base, they do not let go. I asked a tech to relamp 4 DYS fixtures with 4 wide floods and came back to a multi-tool and a dusting of ceramic bits. I'd make sure you can remove the reflector from the socket before investing in any sort of replacement.
     
  10. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    To "restore" a raylight to "normal" PAR64 operation, both the reflector and the GY9.5 socket are removed, then a new Mogul End Prong GX36D socket, PAR64 lamp, and 8" lamp ring is installed.
     
  11. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Most of the kits I've seen look like this:
    DYS 600W Bulb + Par64 Reflector Package Deal

    They use the original socket. To remove them, simply pop the ring and remove the whole thing. The original PAR64 bulb just drops right in. Sounds like your kits may be different if the sockets were changed.
     
  12. techieman33

    techieman33 Well-Known Member

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    the ones we have are like what you posted, just like swapping any other par lamp.
     
  13. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Just happened to be reading about the DYS and caught the info about it's burning position- "Base down to horizontal with filament coil axis horizontal."

    Hummm... In stage lighting, we generally use these above horizontal to almost a base up position, with the coil set to whatever gives us the best beam angle. Maybe that's why we have such lousy luck with the lifespan !!

    Bulbs are pretty cheap, but labor replacing them may not be. Makes sense that any location that is awkward we resort to using a regular PAR or AluPAR bulbs.
     

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