Revolve plans

Van

CBMod
CB Mods
Premium Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
Hey folks! A million apologies to all who thought I had forgotten them. Please follow this link:<broken link removed by mod, see alternate link below>


it's my personal file sharing thingy. This is a zip file; it contains an AutoCAD v14 file along with a bunch of PDF's. No matter what your computer skills you should be able to open and print these. I'm offering these for free, as a member of ControlBooth. Feel free to use just like you would any public domain design. I have been and will continue to be slammed for the next three weeks. Feel free to post, ask, email a question but please don't expect an immediate answer.
Latest designer was 3 weeks late. Lights begins loading in on Tuesday and I don't even have all the flats built yet.

Note to Mods, feel free to edit, sticky, or do whatever to this post. Also feel free to rework the attached drawings, I don't know when I'll ever get to it.

Alternative download: View attachment revolve.zip .

[Link broken as at May 2014] A photo album with pictures of a similar design: https://picasaweb.google.com/108046619267001578363/TurnTableForNoisesOff?authuser=0&feat=directlink#5661295922036708434 .
 
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MPowers

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2010
Location
Des Moines, Iowa
Van,

Nice. I spent many years (30+) as a TD in LORT theatres and as University faculty before I settled into just rigging, did quite a number of revolves, rings etc. My only question is how did you drive the unit??

As to method, all is excellent. Given a choice, time, $$$, Crew, shop capability, I prefer use cold rolled center pins and flange bearings, but I have also used the pipe sleeve method you show. Until you get to high loads, high speed or high usage (permanent install or very frequent use) the pipe sleeve works well. Edge drive wheels do not like the pipe method for long times, endless loop cable, rope or roller chain don't care as much. Pinch drives on a rib don't know the difference but can shift slightly when reversing direction. The main difference is if the turntable surround is flush and level with the revolve, a slightly larger clearance is needed (only about 1/16") to allow for the difference between the pin pipe OD and the sleeve/flange pipe ID.

BTW, I love your sig quote. I always used that line on the first day of teaching stagecraft.

Back to the point, nice turntable.
 

Frank

Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Location
Maine
I meant to post this earlier but forgot... :oops:

I built two 10' revolves this past summer (for The Wizard of Oz) using these plans for inspiration. Each revolve had three double-sided 8' tall flats and four of the six flats were constructed so they could also hold some thin skins constructed of 1/8" louan plywood. Each skin was painted on each side. Our small theater has no wing space and no fly space and we had to improvise like crazy to store, mount/demount skins, etc. We had Dorothy (and friends) marching around the theater singing during revolve changes that occurred with Scarecrow, Tinman, trees, etc. positioned in place: the audience loved it! Scene changes were bang, bang, bang!

We also traveled with this set to another theater for two shows. The revolves were the centerpiece of the show (other than the outstanding acting and singing of course) and were a major contributor to the shows success. Thanks Van!
 

techie7

Member
Joined
May 26, 2012
Location
Maryland
Hey folks! A million apologies to all who thought I had forgotten them. Please follow this link:
revolve.zip.

Alternative download: View attachment 4572 .

A photo album with pictures of a similar design: https://picasaweb.google.com/108046619267001578363/TurnTableForNoisesOff?authuser=0&feat=directlink#5661295922036708434 .
Could you please repost these files. I could not access them, probably because they are from 2006 and are inactive. I am designing a set involving a very similar revolve. I would love to see how you did it. I saw the picasa pictures; the revolve and the set on top of it looks great.
 

shayward

Member
Joined
May 7, 2009
Location
Ohio
Anyone have any ideas for creating a revolve on a stage where the floor cannot be screwed or bolted into? I would assume that with the plans above each of the stringers with the casters on them would need to be bolted or screwed into the deck to insure that they don't move under the moving weight of the revolve....but what can you do if that is not a possibility?
 

Les

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2004
Location
DFW, Tx.
I brought in a rented 30' revolve for a production of Les Mis several years back, and if I recall correctly, nothing was screwed to the deck (though I could be mistaken given I was on LX most of the time). There was the center hub, and the rest went together like a pie. I don't remember the method of attaching everything to the center hub, but once that's done, the sheer weight of the unit should keep it in place. Of course, being 30' in diameter, this revolve was heavy and not short on surface area, so it was not easily "scooted over". Not much lateral force on the hub or the revolve once fully assembled, except coming from the drive tire (in our particular case).
 
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Van

CBMod
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Premium Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
Anyone have any ideas for creating a revolve on a stage where the floor cannot be screwed or bolted into? I would assume that with the plans above each of the stringers with the casters on them would need to be bolted or screwed into the deck to insure that they don't move under the moving weight of the revolve....but what can you do if that is not a possibility?
You know what Assuming does ?

No, you do not have to bolt, screw or tie in any way, the above turntable design to the deck. It is specifically engineered to be portable. The enitre deck, when disassenmbled fits easily into a ford Econoline van, or the very back-end of a 24' Penske.
 

shayward

Member
Joined
May 7, 2009
Location
Ohio
LOL.....of course I know what it does......prime example :)

Thanks for the info Van! I've been wanting to do a turntable for a few shows now, but with the inability to bolt to the deck I always shyed away from it.
 

JDPVS

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2012
Location
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United St
I am doing a show that has 2 20' turntables. As much as i wish we wouldn't we are going for automation on both turntables they also want to use 2 separate motors and gear downs for each turntable. now the kicker is we do not have much of a budget, we have some but not much. My question is do any of you have any advice as to the hp or tork out put i should be using or even a manufacturer that i could look into. I have the skills to build the system myself just not sure what size motor i should be looking into i have heard multiple things.
 

Van

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CB Mods
Premium Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
some more info that may help, each table will have a 20' by 12' double sided wall centered and loaded down with books!
Will you be driving with a live wheel system or will you be using a perimeter Cable/Chain drive ? How fast do you want it to turn ? Estimation on weight ? The "moment of initial inertia" is the formula you are looking for. This equation will give you the necessarily required torque in ft/lbs. Once you have that HP is a bereeze.

On Automation: any system you design is going to need a LOT of safety interlocks, Dead man switches, limiters and the like. I would suggest, if you are doing it yourself that you have a minimum of 2 dead man switches, Both of which must be pressed for the unit to operate. That way you get two pairs of eyes on the unit wating for issues. Take a look at Creative Conners website. In my book they are THE go-to guys for moving unit automation.
 
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kpnac

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2012
Location
Very Upstate NY,
Thanks for the info. This gives me more info for two revolves that are not completely round...On my way to start the build, oh to be a HS director/set designer-builder/lighting designer-director...well everything. Remember those days, nothing like trial by fire..biggest plus, newly renovated "theatre"....new lights and sound systems.
 

JDPVS

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2012
Location
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United St
Will you be driving with a live wheel system or will you be using a perimeter Cable/Chain drive ? How fast do you want it to turn ? Estimation on weight ? The "moment of initial inertia" is the formula you are looking for. This equation will give you the necessarily required torque in ft/lbs. Once you have that HP is a bereeze.

On Automation: any system you design is going to need a LOT of safety interlocks, Dead man switches, limiters and the like. I would suggest, if you are doing it yourself that you have a minimum of 2 dead man switches, Both of which must be pressed for the unit to operate. That way you get two pairs of eyes on the unit wating for issues. Take a look at Creative Conners website. In my book they are THE go-to guys for moving unit automation.
thanks for all the help we ended up getting 2 baldor 1.5 hp motors with a 30:1 geardown controled by a washdown control box. works great and was relativly inexpensive. about $2000 per turntable, we were able to borrow one set and only had to purchase the one. show hasnt opened yet but fingers crossed on the run going smooth!
 

JHWelch

Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2009
Location
Westford, MA
For a portable revolve, how long does it usually take to set one up? I am working on a set for a theatre competition that requires a 5 minute or less put-in time. Is there any way that a revolve could be put in a secured in this time? How long on average does it take? 5 minutes sounds very tight, but was hoping for some tips or pointers.
 

gafftapegreenia

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CB Mods
Joined
Sep 24, 2005
Location
Michigan
For a portable revolve, how long does it usually take to set one up? I am working on a set for a theatre competition that requires a 5 minute or less put-in time. Is there any way that a revolve could be put in a secured in this time? How long on average does it take? 5 minutes sounds very tight, but was hoping for some tips or pointers.
5 minutes to install a revolve? Only way I could see that even being possible is if you super bowl it and have it fully assembled and ready to go in the wings and all you have to do is push it into place and secure it.
 
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macattack

Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Location
Crownsville, MD
Dumb question, but looking for answers from smart people. Let's say we build the above revolve for say, a show like Noises Off. We wouldn't need automation - that's huge, right? BUT - the set needs to be a decent size, hopefully with doors up AND down. What's the weight limit on that revolve and how far "off" the diameter could we go with things like walls? Or do you think it would be better just to build the set with two sides on wagons/wheeled platforms with killer castors and find a creative way to brake the whole thing since it only revolves at intermissions?
 

sk8rsdad

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Premium Member
Fight Leukemia
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Aug 15, 2008
Location
Ottawa
You don't need to build a revolve to rotate the set. The set itself can be built on casters. Also, the set doesn't need to rotate as a single unit, or even rotate at all. It needs to transition from onstage to backstage and back in 2 intermissions.

There are many threads on the site concerning set construction for "Noises Off". The search box in the upper right corner is a really useful tool.
 
Joined
Feb 25, 2015
Location
Ogden, Utah
I meant to post this earlier but forgot... :oops:

I built two 10' revolves this past summer (for The Wizard of Oz) using these plans for inspiration. Each revolve had three double-sided 8' tall flats and four of the six flats were constructed so they could also hold some thin skins constructed of 1/8" louan plywood. Each skin was painted on each side. Our small theater has no wing space and no fly space and we had to improvise like crazy to store, mount/demount skins, etc. We had Dorothy (and friends) marching around the theater singing during revolve changes that occurred with Scarecrow, Tinman, trees, etc. positioned in place: the audience loved it! Scene changes were bang, bang, bang!

We also traveled with this set to another theater for two shows. The revolves were the centerpiece of the show (other than the outstanding acting and singing of course) and were a major contributor to the shows success. Thanks Van!
Reminds me of the old Broadway system of sticking super short scenes into a play so that while the scene was in progress on the apron the stagehands could change the set unseen by the audience. Take a look at the scripts for some old stuff, like Damn Yankees from the '50s.