Connectors needed for handheld halogen

PjB

Member
I'm trying to build two handhelds like the one in this picture for shadow puppetry.
IMG_1568.jpg
I've used these before but never built one, so I know they run very hot and I'm prepared to deal with that in performance.The halogen lamp being close to a point source gives the best range for crisp shadows. The problem I'm having is finding connectors that are rated for the wattage/amperage I'll be needing. (I have zero electrics training and want to be safe.)

First type: 100W, 12VDC (8+ Amps). The one pictured uses a transformer and the wires from the base that accepts the lamp is just joined to the transformer with wire connectors. Is this acceptable / safe? I can't seem to find DC barrel plugs rated over 5 Amps.

I'll probably have to use a portable battery/power source at some point and that has both AC and DC jacks. Would I be better off wiring this DC lamp to connect to the DC port or is it just as good to use the transformer and connect to AC? Is one safer than the other? For DC- I can't find a way to connect to a 14AWG extension (which charts seem to say I need to avoid voltage loss.) I only need about 5' of cord. Would I just connect the bare wires from the lamp base to the extension as done here for the transformer? If I use a transformer I just need to make sure it's rated for 100 Watts and >8 Amps, right? Anything else to watch out for?

Second type: 300W, 120V AC- same question... Can I just wire the lamp base to an extension cord?

Anything I'm not thinking of?

Thanks!
 

MRW Lights

Well-Known Member
Others will come along after me to say more, some nice, some not so nice, but I'm here to say this is not safe and you should not be doing it.

I will unfortunately not add to the conversation by giving you suggestions on how to do unsafe things. Those lamps are intended to be housed and have specific housings for functionality and safety. There are plenty of safe and appropriate sources to accomplish shadow puppetry lighting.

Please do more research in safe and appropriate ways. I'm all for DIY projects and coming up with solutions to problems. However, in this case there are better, safer solutions than what you're trying to do.
 

PjB

Member
A good LED flashlight will do the same thing. Check out the demonstration at the 5:47 mark:
Yes, I’m familiar with the use of single LEDs with blacked-out reflectors. The problem is they’re not bright enough. Notice he was in a dark room. I need something that will be effective in a brighter situation.
 

PjB

Member
Others will come along after me to say more, some nice, some not so nice, but I'm here to say this is not safe and you should not be doing it.

I will unfortunately not add to the conversation by giving you suggestions on how to do unsafe things. Those lamps are intended to be housed and have specific housings for functionality and safety. There are plenty of safe and appropriate sources to accomplish shadow puppetry lighting.

Please do more research in safe and appropriate ways. I'm all for DIY projects and coming up with solutions to problems. However, in this case there are better, safer solutions than what you're trying to do.
I hear you- I haven’t felt safe when put in the position to perform with them in the past which is why I came here to ask how to do it safely. I’ve encountered these in three professional companies- halogens are accepted among puppeteers as the best, brightest option for this type of shadow work. I was hoping lighting pros would have a safer solution on how to build it.
 

FMEng

Well-Known Member
Fight Leukemia
I'll be the nerdy engineer. The electrical safety can be solved easily enough. The real safety problem is the lamp itself. Halogen lamps can explode, sending glass fragments with impressive force. I've seen the damage from a bulb explosion, and I wouldn't want to be anywhere near a naked one. I had one go in an ERS. It sounded like a gunshot and it cracked lenses. An unprotected bulb would be subjected to more contaminants that would make catastrophic failure all the more likely. Even the cheapo, halogen desk lamps, that places like Office Depot used to sell, had thick glass lenses to shield the bulb.

They also produce UV radiation. I don't know whether the UV output is enough to harm to skin or eyes in a short time, but I'm sure someone here can comment. A glass lens, of the right type and thickness of material, could solve both safety issues, but then shedding heat from the bulb and socket becomes the next problem to solve.
 

MRW Lights

Well-Known Member
I hear you- I haven’t felt safe when put in the position to perform with them in the past which is why I came here to ask how to do it safely. I’ve encountered these in three professional companies- halogens are accepted among puppeteers as the best, brightest option for this type of shadow work. I was hoping lighting pros would have a safer solution on how to build it.

Shadow puppetry isn't a new game, neither are projection lamps... The issue isn't with the lamp choice, it's with the unintended, unsafe use of the lamp. You're essentially lighting a firecracker in your hand and watching the fuse burn hoping it doesn't explode.

This can be accomplished with any number of standard theatrical and non theatrical lighting instruments at various wattage, focal lengths, color temperatures, sizes and shapes....

Safety First, Second, and Third. Nothing before safety. Period. No matter how much we love art it's never worth a risk when it comes to safety.
 

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Welcome to the forum, and in asking advise on how to. I agree with those above not to attempt this though not for all the same reasons.

Your fixture frame is fairly well exicuted mechanically, but electrically there is concerning safety and wiring issues in what you were doing apparently not understood yet. Was for instance your lamp the right type fitting into it's lamp socket in seemingly not seating properly in the photo? How was that lamp base socket mounted? Wiring outside the fixture in how it was done is a no-go.

"100W, 12VDC (8+ Amps)", your math and asking, shows your capacity to make a lighting fixture, and in asking an understanding that which you don't know yet to make a light to make this light. Just not yet in understanding more details in how to make a light. Stuff like cord grips, boxes and bushings. Stuff TBD on the concerning example.

The lamp socket appears to be a G-4 lamp socket which would explain why the lamp appears to be not fully seated. There are similar bases on the market that could mount a G-5.3 lamp base but they would fully seat the lamp. It does not appear this proper lamp base for the lamp was in use, but I could be wrong.

As there is no currently available 12v/100 lamps with a G-4 lamp pin, it must be a G-5.3 lamp into the wrong base, or using a discontinued lamp, or using an actual G-4/G-5.3 base lamp socket, but it not being seated properly in the photo. Either its the wrong lamp socket for the lamp in not able to fully seat the lamp, or it is the correct lamp socket, but in not fully seating the lamp... it is of sufficient concern out of concern.

What lamp are you attempting to use assuming 100w/12v? Ansi lamp DZB or GCC? GCC has more output and much longer lamp life. These are both 12v AC/DC lamps. Or it could be something else. Please specify the lamp you want to use as per a design detail. Why if a AC/DC lamp are you doing this DC?

Fair enough in transforming to 12VDC , but not mandated if the lamp types noted. Just a question on that.

No, your open faced low voltage fixtures on puppets are any problem in need of lenses or safety screens! You are probably correct in what you used and are trying to make. Nor will it be a problem in a 12v what ever voltage type lamp being an explosive risk.

The main problem is "professionally" made gear using UL listed parts. That's a huge sticker. Get what you are going at, how to proceed from here though is a problem in making if even a puppet light, to fabricate the lighting fixture you need.

I think the forum able to help with starting from there, though LED's and fixtures such as various PAR cans that can do a sealed beam lamp of various beam spreads, are readily on the market still and you should look into them in doing the simple first.

Interchange halogen with quartz in the same engineering of lamps and just parts or working concepts of them... of any sort under say 120 volt lamps, they don't explode or for the purpose of puppets in show have any risk of being showered down with glass. Audience and crew do not have any problems either. Open faced wash lights of halogen source at 12v do not need protective screening or lenses to protect the puppet "talent".

Was totally cool I did for some concert tour a few years ago, some 1Kw shadow effect projectors on short notice. Biggest challenge was finding the highest wattage but smallest filament incandescent lamp I would not need a safety screen for. Been all thru the science of "Shadow Effect" in inventing lights for that purpose. Dave Burn or someone like that in name for video I caught by accident while on further jobsite back to the hotel. "I did this?" That was the first "wow" for me for years in seeing work done.

You can do this, just not yet in the easy and safe to do with what you are ready for yet.
 
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PjB

Member
I'll be the nerdy engineer. The electrical safety can be solved easily enough. The real safety problem is the lamp itself. Halogen lamps can explode, sending glass fragments with impressive force. I've seen the damage from a bulb explosion, and I wouldn't want to be anywhere near a naked one. I had one go in an ERS. It sounded like a gunshot and it cracked lenses. An unprotected bulb would be subjected to more contaminants that would make catastrophic failure all the more likely. Even the cheapo, halogen desk lamps, that places like Office Depot used to sell, had thick glass lenses to shield the bulb.

They also produce UV radiation. I don't know whether the UV output is enough to harm to skin or eyes in a short time, but I'm sure someone here can comment. A glass lens, of the right type and thickness of material, could solve both safety issues, but then shedding heat from the bulb and socket becomes the next problem to solve.
Thank you, this is obviously important to know! The first place I was introduced to the use of bare halogens was in grad school! My professor insisted that it was imperative to protect our audience’s eyes by having an adequate screen that would eliminate the hot spot- but the the only instruction we received about the bulb was to never touch it with bare hands when changing it. I had no idea it was so perilous, other than the obvious danger from fire risk- which we thought we had covered. It burns me up- sorry for the pun- that this is being practiced and taught.
 

PjB

Member
Shadow puppetry isn't a new game, neither are projection lamps... The issue isn't with the lamp choice, it's with the unintended, unsafe use of the lamp. You're essentially lighting a firecracker in your hand and watching the fuse burn hoping it doesn't explode.

This can be accomplished with any number of standard theatrical and non theatrical lighting instruments at various wattage, focal lengths, color temperatures, sizes and shapes....

Safety First, Second, and Third. Nothing before safety. Period. No matter how much we love art it's never worth a risk when it comes to safety.
Great- what would you suggest as the brightest, safest
Shadow puppetry isn't a new game, neither are projection lamps... The issue isn't with the lamp choice, it's with the unintended, unsafe use of the lamp. You're essentially lighting a firecracker in your hand and watching the fuse burn hoping it doesn't explode.

This can be accomplished with any number of standard theatrical and non theatrical lighting instruments at various wattage, focal lengths, color temperatures, sizes and shapes....

Safety First, Second, and Third. Nothing before safety. Period. No matter how much we love art it's never worth a risk when it comes to safety.
Great- so can you recommend an instrument that will provide a very bright, point source of light? I’m looking for the depth of field that was demonstrated so well in the video but that doesn’t require as dark a room. A 10 watt LED won’t cut it. I think a short throw lens on a projector might work for some instances, but really need something handheld.
 

PjB

Member
No, your open faced low voltage fixtures on puppets are any problem in need of lenses or safety screens! You are probably correct in what you used and are trying to make. Nor will it be a problem in a 12v what ever voltage type lamp being an explosive risk.
I think the forum able to help with starting from there, though LED's and fixtures such as various PAR cans that can do a sealed beam lamp of various beam spreads, are readily on the market still and you should look into them in doing the simple first.

Interchange halogen with quartz in the same engineering of lamps and just parts or working concepts of them... of any sort under say 120 volt lamps, they don't explode or for the purpose of puppets in show have any risk of being showered down with glass. Audience and crew do not have any problems either. Open faced wash lights of halogen source at 12v do not need protective screening or lenses to protect the puppet "talent".

Was totally cool I did for some concert tour a few years ago, some 1Kw shadow effect projectors on short notice. Biggest challenge was finding the highest wattage but smallest filament incandescent lamp I would not need a safety screen for. Been all thru the science of "Shadow Effect" in inventing lights for that purpose. Dave Burn or someone like that in name for video I caught by accident while on further jobsite back to the hotel. "I did this?" That was the first "wow" for me for years in seeing work done.

You can do this, just not yet in the easy and safe to do with what you are ready for yet.
[/QUOTE]
 

PjB

Member
...What lamp are you attempting to use assuming 100w/12v? Ansi lamp DZB or GCC? GCC has more output and much longer lamp life. These are both 12v AC/DC lamps. Or it could be something else. Please specify the lamp you want to use as per a design detail. Why if a AC/DC lamp are you doing this DC?

... Nor will it be a problem in a 12v what ever voltage type lamp being an explosive risk.

...Interchange halogen with quartz in the same engineering of lamps and just parts or working concepts of them... of any sort under say 120 volt lamps, they don't explode or for the purpose of puppets in show have any risk of being showered down with glass. Audience and crew do not have any problems either. Open faced wash lights of halogen source at 12v do not need protective screening or lenses to protect the puppet "talent".

...Was totally cool I did for some concert tour a few years ago, some 1Kw shadow effect projectors on short notice. Biggest challenge was finding the highest wattage but smallest filament incandescent lamp I would not need a safety screen for. Been all thru the science of "Shadow Effect" in inventing lights for that purpose. Dave Burn or someone like that in name for video I caught by accident while on further jobsite back to the hotel. "I did this?" That was the first "wow" for me for years in seeing work done.
My apologies for the dead end responses- I had trouble responding on my phone and computer is also struggling with the site.

Thanks for all of this, Ship.

The fixture/lamp picture I posted is not mine, and I never used it. It was in use in a touring production that I visited, so I can't answer to the lamp or the socket issues. It is the same portable design/ open halogen lamp I've encountered elsewhere though.

Are you saying a 12V halogen is not an explosive risk? I'll look into quartz too, thanks. Unfortunately I do my own producing in addition to contract work, so I don't always have access to things other than at the consumer level.

Here's the 12V lamp I was planning to use- "Ansi lamp DZB or GCC" reveals more of my ignorance. I'll do more research but see nothing on the product info about that. Would you have time to explain a bit?
The socket I chose:
And the transformer:

To sum up- yes, finding the highest wattage but smallest filament is the biggest issue for this work. In fact, we place the halogen bulbs so that the edge of the filament faces out to get the smallest surface area emission possible. Would you mind describing further the effect on that concert tour you did? A projector won't work for the application I'm trying to solve, but it sounds cool.

Thanks again!
 

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Halogen describes the gas inside a lamp re-depositing the spent tungsten back on the filament which allows for more output, smaller filament in many cases, and a higher color temperature, and longer lamp life than an incandescent lamp (also in many cases unless high output version).
Quartz describes the higher temperature type of glass used on a halogen lamp instead of Soft Lime glass used on incandescent lamps. It's purity and higher operating temperature on a line voltage lamp (84v or higher) will be effected by touching it - oils from the skin, or dirt, or fog goo etc. coating and bonding with the pure glass in having adverse effects to it working properly = including explosion stated above and you learned. A low voltage halogen lamp c. 64v or less does not get hot enough for touching the globe to fail, nor will it explode. Been professionally doing lamps since about 1993 and touching a low voltage lamp has never been the cause of explosion I have seen. Not a bad idea to retain the no touch concept though.

There is a few types of halogen lamps which do not use a quartz bulb/envelope. A few discontinued A-Lamp types and some PS-52 ANSI DKZ types amongst a few others. They had quartz capsules inside of a larger standard soft lime glass outer globe. Otherwise it hurts my brain when people confuse halogen verses quartz as two different lamps, just as much as when people call a lamp a bulb.

Smallest filament design (below lamps cited) eludes me in ever understanding C-Bar6 verses c-6, Axial verses TransAxial, C-6 oval, 4.6x3mm area... What I could tell would be the smaller the number or size, the more point source the light source. Osram had/has an excellent free PDF book on the design factors going into a halogen lamp's design. Pick one of the ANSI lamps below such as the EVA, scroll down to the "doccuments" section and hopefully this book is still an option to download. It will explain all about halogen lamps including filament size and structure. Dependant on the brand, Philips for instance from euro catalogues state area the filament takes up instead of it's size and support structure. That's a better concept but does not persay translate to other info.

Below are some of many lamp notes I have taken over the years as I had to learn lamps that might be of help.

Far below is a list of lamps similar to the one you plan on using. Last number noted assuming my table will not transfer is expected lamp life. Note, given LED lamps are really popular now, many or most lamps listed are probably discontinued, but you will see some with even higher output or smaller filament sizes that might still be available to search for.

ANSI = American National Standards Institute. A consensus organization which coordinates voluntary standards for the physical, electrical and performance characteristics of lamps, ballasts, luminaries and other lighting and electrical equipment. The ANSI code is one of a few basic standards for describing lamps. J-Code or Japan code as per the lamp you describe above is a fairly standardized amongst brands description of the lamp which could also be ANSI coded. GE also in description code has a recognized lamp description code standard similar in many ways to the J-Code.


Capsule = The most compact halogen lamps and can be used for a wide range of applications. The capsules are low pressure lamps produced according to IEC 357 with a special operating filling gas pressure ≤2.5 bar to be used in luminaries without front glass (according to IEC 598). The capsules have an axial filament, a clear bulb and have a G4 or GY 6.35 base. Axial filament gives higher light output in combination with luminaries and a uniform beam.

Corex Glass = c.1964 In some larger sizes (wattages) for special purposes, a special glass called Cores is being used. This permits a smaller bulb than would be possible with ordinary glass because of the heat involved in operation. (?Later called Quartz Glass?) (A Syllabus for Stage Lighting, Stanley McCandless c.1964 p.10)

Fused Silica = Improved Quartz Glass with silica fused to the wall material. Used on high fill pressure/wattage lamps for over 50% more efficiency.

Hal = Halogen Lamp - A short name for the tungsten-halogen lamp. Halogen lamps are high pressure incandescent lamps containing halogen gasses such as iodine or bromine which allow the filaments to be operated at higher temperatures and higher efficacies. A high-temperature chemical reaction involving tungsten and the halogen gas recycles evaporated particles of tungsten back onto the filament surface. Also called a Quartz lamp, though this is a term for the higher melting temperature glass enclosure used on halogen lamp

HRG = Bulb made of Special Thremal-Shock Resistant & Heat Resistant Glass

Qxx = 1st Digit, Lamp Code for Halogen Lamp w. Quartz Glass.

Quartz = Common description of the type of glass used in and implying a Tungsten Halogen Lamp.
Quartz = A type of glass used for halogen, HMI, and other high output / high temperature type lamps. This type of glass construction is used extensively on Stage and Studio lamps. Quartz glass is more expensive but has better reliability and virtually constant color temperatures. They also are capable of withstanding higher temperatures without deforming or breaking which allows for a smaller lamps envelope in thickness and diameter in closeness to the heat source. Quartz glass is also able to support coatings such as Infrared and Dichroic coatings used to prevent the more harmful un-seen rays of light from leaving the lamp and keeps both the fixture’s lenses and beam cooler. This also allows for a hotter filament temperature without extra energy used to achieve it. When Halogen gas is combined with Quartz glass, a hotter filament is also able to become smaller and more point source. For incandescent lamps, soft lime glass is used because the soft glass is easy to work with and will telerate temperatures up to 350°C.

Tungsten Halogen Lamps = Halogen Lamps are tungsten fliament incandescent lamps filled with an inert gas (usually krypton or xenon to insulate the filament and decrease heat losses) to which a trace of halogen vapor (bromine) has been added. Tungsten vaporized from the filament wire is intercepted by the halogen gas before it reaches the wall of the bulb, and is returned to the filament. Therefore, the glass bulb stays clean and the light output remains constant over the entire life of the lamp. (p33, Sylvania Lamp & Ballast Product Catalog 2002)

Low Voltage Dimming: Low Voltage halogen lamps should not be dimmed by more than 10% of their rated voltage since this will result in a reduction in life. Standard tungsten filament lamps (with no halogen filling), can be dimmed to zero volts, resulting in virtually endless life. However if low voltage tungsten halogen lamps are dimmed by more than 10%, the lamp will be operating at too low a temperature and the free halogens in the gas fill, will attack the cooler parts of the tungsten filament i.e. where enters the quartz or glass envelope. The wire at that point will then be eroded and eventually will fail. So if dimmed by 10% or more low voltage tungsten halogen lamps will not have an extended life but are unlikely even to reach their rated life. - Philips Website, Optical p1

On Lamps:
FCR G.E. #14876 High Output, CL, Quartz All Glass 100w/12v T-3 c-6 Oval LCL 1.3/16" GY 6.35 (0.2x0.15" Filmt.) Base Down to Horz. 3,300°K 2,800 Lum 50
FCR Osram/Sylvania #54036 (#64625 HLX) (A1/215) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/2 4.2x2.3mm LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Base Down ±90° 3,600 Lum 50
FCR Philips #26101-6 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-6F LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Base Down to Horz. 3,250°K 3,400 Lum 50
FCR Philips #923870017100 (#7023)(A1/215)(JC 12-100) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-11.5mm 4.2x2.3mm LCL 30mm GY 6.35 (Flat Filament) Base Down ±90° 3,400°K 3,400 Lum 50
FCR Ushio #1000490 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v 11.5mmCap c6 Oval LCL 30mm GY 6.35 (Base Down to Horz) 3,300°K 3,400 Lum 50
FCR Wiko CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3 c-Bar-6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 3,250°K 2,900 Lum 50
FCR Norman Lamps CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3 c-6 Oval MOL 1.3/4" 2-Pin 3,300°K 2,800 Lum 50
FCR Halco CL, Quartz 100w/12v 2-Pin c-6 2-Pin Base Down to Horz. 3,300°K 4,500 Lum 50
FCR Norman Lamps (#64458 / 64625 / 64623) (JC-12100B) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY 6.35 2,800°K 2,000
FCR-32 Norman Lamps (64625/32) (JC-12100/32) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY 6.35 3,200°K 2,000
FCR-AX Norman Lamps (#64458AX / 64625AX) (JC-12100AX) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm Axial Fmt MOL 44mm GY 6.35 2,800°K 2,000
FCR (FR) Norman Lamps (#64458-FR / 64625-FR) (JC-12100FR) FR, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY 6.35 2,800°K 2,000
#13100 Philips #924040017100 CL, Quartz Capsule (Low Pressure/UV Block) 100w/12v T-12mm Axial LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Universal Burn 3,000°K 2,200 Lum 2,000
QT12-tr Thron (M28) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v Capsule Trans Ax GY 6.35 Color Rendering Group #1A 3,000°K 2,350 Lum 2,000
RJL100w/24/GY6,35 Radium #223 11222 (12/05) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/24v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY-6.35 UV-Filter 3,000°K 2,200 Lum 2,000

FDX G.E.(?disc.) (Disc.) CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-4 c-6 LCL 1.18" 2-Pin Cera Base Down to Horz 3,300°K 2,900 Lum 50
FDX Osram/Sylvania #54445 Quartz 100w/12v T-3.1/2 2 Pin 2,900 Lum 50
FDX Ushio #1000507 (JC12v-100wC2) CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-11.5mm C-6 Oval LCL 30mm GY6.35-13 Any Burn Pos. 3,300°K 3,500 Lum 50
FDX Wiko CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-4 c-Bar-6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 W. Ceramic Seal Cover 3,300°K 2,900 Lum 50
FDX Norman Lamps CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-4 c-6 MOL 1.3/4" 2-Pin 3,300°K 2,900 Lum 50
FDX Halco CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-4 c-6 2Pin Cera Base Down to Horz. 3,300°K 2,900 Lum 50
EVA G.E. #34676 (M-28) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm cc-6 Transv LCL 30mm G 6.35 3,000°K 2,350 Lum 2,000
EVA G.E.(?disc.) (M-28) (Disc.) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-6 LCL 1.17" GY 6.35 Base Down to Horz. 3,350°K 2,500 Lum 1,000
EVA #54051 Osram/Sylvania #54052 (#64623 HLX) ( M-28) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-4 4.7x2.7mm LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Base Down ±90° (CRI 100) ?3,200°K 2,800 Lum 2,000
EVA Philips #25676-8 (#7724) (M-28) CL, Quartz Capsule (Flat Filmt.) 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-6F LCL 30mm GY 6.35 (4.8x3mm Filmt.) Any Burn Pos. 3,200°K 2,500 Lum 1,000
EVA Philips #923872517100 (?Disc.)(#7724) (M-28) CL, Quartz Capsule (Flat Filmt.) 100w/12v T11.5mm 4.8x3mm LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Base Down ±90° 3,100°K 2,550 Lum 2,000
EVA Ushio (JC12v-100wB) (?Disc.) CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-11.5mm c60Val LCL 30mm G6.35-13 3,100°K 2,200 Lum 1,000
EVA Ushio #1000381 (JC12v-100H20) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v 11.5mmCap cBar6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 (Base Down to Horz) 3,000°K 2,400 Lum 2,000
EVA Wiko CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-Bar-6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 3,200°K 2,400 Lum 1,000
EVA Halco CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-6 2-Pin Base Down to Horz 3,350°K 2,500 Lum 1,000
Q100T3/12v/CL G.E. #34676 (?disc.) CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-3 cc-6 MOL 1.3/4" GY 6.35 2,350 Lum 2,000
100T3.25Q/CL Reflekto #116210 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/4 c-8 MOL 44mm GY 6.35 Dimmable/UV Prot. Glass, Art-Nr #11623 2,500 Lum 2,000
JC12v-100wG Ushio #1000807 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-11mm c-8 LCL 30mm G 6.35 Any Burn Pos. 3,000°K 2,300 Lum 2,000
JC 12v-100w Ushio #1000806 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-11mm c-6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Universal Burn 3,000°K 2,300 Lum 2,000
JC100 12v GY6.35/CL Dura Lamp CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v JC MOL 1.3/4" GY 6.35 3,000°K 2,500 Lum 3,000
JC12v100w20H/G2 EYE #82844 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3 c-Bar-6 MOL 44mm GY 6.35 3,000°K 1,900 Lum 2,000
JC12v100w20H/G1 EYE #82795 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3 c-Bar-6 MOL 44mm G 6.35 3,000°K 1,900 Lum 2,000
JC 100T4 Abco #04429 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-4 cc-6 MOL 1.3/4" GY 6.35 3,050°K 2,000 Lum. 2,000
JC100 Helco #107004 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-4 c-6 MOL 1.9/16" GY 6.35 3,000°K 2,200 Lum 2,000
JCR (American DJ) 100w/12v 1,000
Q100GY6/12 Bulbrite #650100 CL, Quartz, UV-Stop 100w/12v JC LCL 1.3/4" GY 6.35 2,000 Lum 2,000
#64460 Norman Lamps (JC-24100B) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY 6.35 2,800°K 2,000
100JC12v A & H CL, Quartz 100w/12v c-6 MOL 1.23/32" GY 6.35 Available w. C-Bar-6 Filament 2,000 Lum
JC 12v/100w Jiadair CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-10mm MOL 44mm G 6.35 1,950 Lum 2,000
JD 12v/100w Sonlite CL, Quartz 100w/12v G 6.35 3,000°K 1,900 Lum 2,000
JC12v-100wF Ushio #1000805 (?Disc.) FR, Quartz 100w/12v c-6 G 6.35 2,000
 
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ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Great- what would you suggest as the brightest, safest

Great- so can you recommend an instrument that will provide a very bright, point source of light? I’m looking for the depth of field that was demonstrated so well in the video but that doesn’t require as dark a room. A 10 watt LED won’t cut it. I think a short throw lens on a projector might work for some instances, but really need something handheld.
Omni Lights used to use a line voltage (120v) G-6.35 lamp size in a UL listed lighting fixture you intend to use in a lamp type. Think something like DS-5 but a black hole in my notes as to which fixture specifically. Apparently totally discontinued so something from Gear Source or E-Bay to search for. You would than need to transform the fixture to your voltage. If the fixture with reflector is not point source enough, you can always remove the reflector.
 
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PjB

Member
Halogen describes the gas inside a lamp re-depositing the spent tungsten back on the filament which allows for more output, smaller filament in many cases, and a higher color temperature, and longer lamp life than an incandescent lamp (also in many cases unless high output version).
Quartz describes the higher temperature type of glass used on a halogen lamp instead of Soft Lime glass used on incandescent lamps. It's purity and higher operating temperature on a line voltage lamp (84v or higher) will be effected by touching it - oils from the skin, or dirt, or fog goo etc. coating and bonding with the pure glass in having adverse effects to it working properly = including explosion stated above and you learned. A low voltage halogen lamp c. 64v or less does not get hot enough for touching the globe to fail, nor will it explode. Been professionally doing lamps since about 1993 and touching a low voltage lamp has never been the cause of explosion I have seen. Not a bad idea to retain the no touch concept though.

There is a few types of halogen lamps which do not use a quartz bulb/envelope. A few discontinued A-Lamp types and some PS-52 ANSI DKZ types amongst a few others. They had quartz capsules inside of a larger standard soft lime glass outer globe. Otherwise it hurts my brain when people confuse halogen verses quartz as two different lamps, just as much as when people call a lamp a bulb.

Smallest filament design (below lamps cited) eludes me in ever understanding C-Bar6 verses c-6, Axial verses TransAxial, C-6 oval, 4.6x3mm area... What I could tell would be the smaller the number or size, the more point source the light source. Osram had/has an excellent free PDF book on the design factors going into a halogen lamp's design. Pick one of the ANSI lamps below such as the EVA, scroll down to the "doccuments" section and hopefully this book is still an option to download. It will explain all about halogen lamps including filament size and structure. Dependant on the brand, Philips for instance from euro catalogues state area the filament takes up instead of it's size and support structure. That's a better concept but does not persay translate to other info.

Below are some of many lamp notes I have taken over the years as I had to learn lamps that might be of help.

Far below is a list of lamps similar to the one you plan on using. Last number noted assuming my table will not transfer is expected lamp life. Note, given LED lamps are really popular now, many or most lamps listed are probably discontinued, but you will see some with even higher output or smaller filament sizes that might still be available to search for.

ANSI = American National Standards Institute. A consensus organization which coordinates voluntary standards for the physical, electrical and performance characteristics of lamps, ballasts, luminaries and other lighting and electrical equipment. The ANSI code is one of a few basic standards for describing lamps. J-Code or Japan code as per the lamp you describe above is a fairly standardized amongst brands description of the lamp which could also be ANSI coded. GE also in description code has a recognized lamp description code standard similar in many ways to the J-Code.


Capsule = The most compact halogen lamps and can be used for a wide range of applications. The capsules are low pressure lamps produced according to IEC 357 with a special operating filling gas pressure ≤2.5 bar to be used in luminaries without front glass (according to IEC 598). The capsules have an axial filament, a clear bulb and have a G4 or GY 6.35 base. Axial filament gives higher light output in combination with luminaries and a uniform beam.

Corex Glass = c.1964 In some larger sizes (wattages) for special purposes, a special glass called Cores is being used. This permits a smaller bulb than would be possible with ordinary glass because of the heat involved in operation. (?Later called Quartz Glass?) (A Syllabus for Stage Lighting, Stanley McCandless c.1964 p.10)

Fused Silica = Improved Quartz Glass with silica fused to the wall material. Used on high fill pressure/wattage lamps for over 50% more efficiency.

Hal = Halogen Lamp - A short name for the tungsten-halogen lamp. Halogen lamps are high pressure incandescent lamps containing halogen gasses such as iodine or bromine which allow the filaments to be operated at higher temperatures and higher efficacies. A high-temperature chemical reaction involving tungsten and the halogen gas recycles evaporated particles of tungsten back onto the filament surface. Also called a Quartz lamp, though this is a term for the higher melting temperature glass enclosure used on halogen lamp

HRG = Bulb made of Special Thremal-Shock Resistant & Heat Resistant Glass

Qxx = 1st Digit, Lamp Code for Halogen Lamp w. Quartz Glass.

Quartz = Common description of the type of glass used in and implying a Tungsten Halogen Lamp.
Quartz = A type of glass used for halogen, HMI, and other high output / high temperature type lamps. This type of glass construction is used extensively on Stage and Studio lamps. Quartz glass is more expensive but has better reliability and virtually constant color temperatures. They also are capable of withstanding higher temperatures without deforming or breaking which allows for a smaller lamps envelope in thickness and diameter in closeness to the heat source. Quartz glass is also able to support coatings such as Infrared and Dichroic coatings used to prevent the more harmful un-seen rays of light from leaving the lamp and keeps both the fixture’s lenses and beam cooler. This also allows for a hotter filament temperature without extra energy used to achieve it. When Halogen gas is combined with Quartz glass, a hotter filament is also able to become smaller and more point source. For incandescent lamps, soft lime glass is used because the soft glass is easy to work with and will telerate temperatures up to 350°C.

Tungsten Halogen Lamps = Halogen Lamps are tungsten fliament incandescent lamps filled with an inert gas (usually krypton or xenon to insulate the filament and decrease heat losses) to which a trace of halogen vapor (bromine) has been added. Tungsten vaporized from the filament wire is intercepted by the halogen gas before it reaches the wall of the bulb, and is returned to the filament. Therefore, the glass bulb stays clean and the light output remains constant over the entire life of the lamp. (p33, Sylvania Lamp & Ballast Product Catalog 2002)

Low Voltage Dimming: Low Voltage halogen lamps should not be dimmed by more than 10% of their rated voltage since this will result in a reduction in life. Standard tungsten filament lamps (with no halogen filling), can be dimmed to zero volts, resulting in virtually endless life. However if low voltage tungsten halogen lamps are dimmed by more than 10%, the lamp will be operating at too low a temperature and the free halogens in the gas fill, will attack the cooler parts of the tungsten filament i.e. where enters the quartz or glass envelope. The wire at that point will then be eroded and eventually will fail. So if dimmed by 10% or more low voltage tungsten halogen lamps will not have an extended life but are unlikely even to reach their rated life. - Philips Website, Optical p1

On Lamps:
FCR G.E. #14876 High Output, CL, Quartz All Glass 100w/12v T-3 c-6 Oval LCL 1.3/16" GY 6.35 (0.2x0.15" Filmt.) Base Down to Horz. 3,300°K 2,800 Lum 50
FCR Osram/Sylvania #54036 (#64625 HLX) (A1/215) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/2 4.2x2.3mm LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Base Down ±90° 3,600 Lum 50
FCR Philips #26101-6 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-6F LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Base Down to Horz. 3,250°K 3,400 Lum 50
FCR Philips #923870017100 (#7023)(A1/215)(JC 12-100) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-11.5mm 4.2x2.3mm LCL 30mm GY 6.35 (Flat Filament) Base Down ±90° 3,400°K 3,400 Lum 50
FCR Ushio #1000490 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v 11.5mmCap c6 Oval LCL 30mm GY 6.35 (Base Down to Horz) 3,300°K 3,400 Lum 50
FCR Wiko CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3 c-Bar-6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 3,250°K 2,900 Lum 50
FCR Norman Lamps CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3 c-6 Oval MOL 1.3/4" 2-Pin 3,300°K 2,800 Lum 50
FCR Halco CL, Quartz 100w/12v 2-Pin c-6 2-Pin Base Down to Horz. 3,300°K 4,500 Lum 50
FCR Norman Lamps (#64458 / 64625 / 64623) (JC-12100B) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY 6.35 2,800°K 2,000
FCR-32 Norman Lamps (64625/32) (JC-12100/32) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY 6.35 3,200°K 2,000
FCR-AX Norman Lamps (#64458AX / 64625AX) (JC-12100AX) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm Axial Fmt MOL 44mm GY 6.35 2,800°K 2,000
FCR (FR) Norman Lamps (#64458-FR / 64625-FR) (JC-12100FR) FR, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY 6.35 2,800°K 2,000
#13100 Philips #924040017100 CL, Quartz Capsule (Low Pressure/UV Block) 100w/12v T-12mm Axial LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Universal Burn 3,000°K 2,200 Lum 2,000
QT12-tr Thron (M28) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v Capsule Trans Ax GY 6.35 Color Rendering Group #1A 3,000°K 2,350 Lum 2,000
RJL100w/24/GY6,35 Radium #223 11222 (12/05) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/24v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY-6.35 UV-Filter 3,000°K 2,200 Lum 2,000

FDX G.E.(?disc.) (Disc.) CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-4 c-6 LCL 1.18" 2-Pin Cera Base Down to Horz 3,300°K 2,900 Lum 50
FDX Osram/Sylvania #54445 Quartz 100w/12v T-3.1/2 2 Pin 2,900 Lum 50
FDX Ushio #1000507 (JC12v-100wC2) CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-11.5mm C-6 Oval LCL 30mm GY6.35-13 Any Burn Pos. 3,300°K 3,500 Lum 50
FDX Wiko CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-4 c-Bar-6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 W. Ceramic Seal Cover 3,300°K 2,900 Lum 50
FDX Norman Lamps CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-4 c-6 MOL 1.3/4" 2-Pin 3,300°K 2,900 Lum 50
FDX Halco CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-4 c-6 2Pin Cera Base Down to Horz. 3,300°K 2,900 Lum 50
EVA G.E. #34676 (M-28) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm cc-6 Transv LCL 30mm G 6.35 3,000°K 2,350 Lum 2,000
EVA G.E.(?disc.) (M-28) (Disc.) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-6 LCL 1.17" GY 6.35 Base Down to Horz. 3,350°K 2,500 Lum 1,000
EVA #54051 Osram/Sylvania #54052 (#64623 HLX) ( M-28) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-4 4.7x2.7mm LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Base Down ±90° (CRI 100) ?3,200°K 2,800 Lum 2,000
EVA Philips #25676-8 (#7724) (M-28) CL, Quartz Capsule (Flat Filmt.) 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-6F LCL 30mm GY 6.35 (4.8x3mm Filmt.) Any Burn Pos. 3,200°K 2,500 Lum 1,000
EVA Philips #923872517100 (?Disc.)(#7724) (M-28) CL, Quartz Capsule (Flat Filmt.) 100w/12v T11.5mm 4.8x3mm LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Base Down ±90° 3,100°K 2,550 Lum 2,000
EVA Ushio (JC12v-100wB) (?Disc.) CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-11.5mm c60Val LCL 30mm G6.35-13 3,100°K 2,200 Lum 1,000
EVA Ushio #1000381 (JC12v-100H20) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v 11.5mmCap cBar6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 (Base Down to Horz) 3,000°K 2,400 Lum 2,000
EVA Wiko CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-Bar-6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 3,200°K 2,400 Lum 1,000
EVA Halco CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-3.1/2 c-6 2-Pin Base Down to Horz 3,350°K 2,500 Lum 1,000
Q100T3/12v/CL G.E. #34676 (?disc.) CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-3 cc-6 MOL 1.3/4" GY 6.35 2,350 Lum 2,000
100T3.25Q/CL Reflekto #116210 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3.1/4 c-8 MOL 44mm GY 6.35 Dimmable/UV Prot. Glass, Art-Nr #11623 2,500 Lum 2,000
JC12v-100wG Ushio #1000807 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-11mm c-8 LCL 30mm G 6.35 Any Burn Pos. 3,000°K 2,300 Lum 2,000
JC 12v-100w Ushio #1000806 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-11mm c-6 LCL 30mm GY 6.35 Universal Burn 3,000°K 2,300 Lum 2,000
JC100 12v GY6.35/CL Dura Lamp CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v JC MOL 1.3/4" GY 6.35 3,000°K 2,500 Lum 3,000
JC12v100w20H/G2 EYE #82844 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3 c-Bar-6 MOL 44mm GY 6.35 3,000°K 1,900 Lum 2,000
JC12v100w20H/G1 EYE #82795 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-3 c-Bar-6 MOL 44mm G 6.35 3,000°K 1,900 Lum 2,000
JC 100T4 Abco #04429 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-4 cc-6 MOL 1.3/4" GY 6.35 3,050°K 2,000 Lum. 2,000
JC100 Helco #107004 CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-4 c-6 MOL 1.9/16" GY 6.35 3,000°K 2,200 Lum 2,000
JCR (American DJ) 100w/12v 1,000
Q100GY6/12 Bulbrite #650100 CL, Quartz, UV-Stop 100w/12v JC LCL 1.3/4" GY 6.35 2,000 Lum 2,000
#64460 Norman Lamps (JC-24100B) CL, Quartz Capsule 100w/12v T-12mm MOL 44mm GY 6.35 2,800°K 2,000
100JC12v A & H CL, Quartz 100w/12v c-6 MOL 1.23/32" GY 6.35 Available w. C-Bar-6 Filament 2,000 Lum
JC 12v/100w Jiadair CL, Quartz 100w/12v T-10mm MOL 44mm G 6.35 1,950 Lum 2,000
JD 12v/100w Sonlite CL, Quartz 100w/12v G 6.35 3,000°K 1,900 Lum 2,000
JC12v-100wF Ushio #1000805 (?Disc.) FR, Quartz 100w/12v c-6 G 6.35 2,000
WOW! Very helpful, thank you, Ship!
 

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
So nobody had a problem with the below quote? Might explain in part in being similar to a past posting about re-starting up a theater's lamps after quarantine. Or not, but I will have thought it to be as curious to anyone that read it.

Me in citing a reference from my notes - but not a cited book or date of it spells early concepts. It says around 10 years ago in me typing it to my notes for study on lamps without fully cited dates or catalogues. Was it pre-low voltage dimmer architectural lamp dimmers using normal 120v dimmers to dim even 120v to 12v lamp fixtures? Track lights for the time? Important to know.... Such is the below just question about.


Low Voltage Dimming: Low Voltage halogen lamps should not be dimmed by more than 10% of their rated voltage since this will result in a reduction in life. Standard tungsten filament lamps (with no halogen filling), can be dimmed to zero volts, resulting in virtually endless life. However if low voltage tungsten halogen lamps are dimmed by more than 10%, the lamp will be operating at too low a temperature and the free halogens in the gas fill, will attack the cooler parts of the tungsten filament i.e. where enters the quartz or glass envelope. The wire at that point will then be eroded and eventually will fail. So if dimmed by 10% or more low voltage tungsten halogen lamps will not have an extended life but are unlikely even to reach their rated life. - Philips Website, Optical p1
 

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Yes correct. But in going back to a past this year CB' Lighting conversation about re-starting up a theater after warming current to the lamps has been on for a year, some lamps were noted to be failing with no apparent reason... Perhaps at the higher voltage it just takes longer at low warming current voltage when the lamp halogen engine is not turned on once in a while to refresh.

Believe I mentioned in the other post while talking about the theory, perhaps if going into "Closed for the season" mode, a theater might shut down it's dimmers, and or have some program for say once or twice a week, the system should be programmed to auto ramp up to full for say an hour for the halogen effect to happen on line voltage halogen lamps. A possible solution to the theory, and now another pre-programmed "energy saving " concept mode. What if the system has not been use for say two weeks, the dimmers shut down and go thru a pre-programmed ramping up in prepping the lamps and dimmers for the next new usage..

Or perhaps due to dimmer chopping instead of voltage reduction, the halogen effect at line or low voltage in down to 10% or lower, there still is enough heat as it were at that chopping voltage, the halogen effect still functions. Does this work for a year?

This all is perhaps not studied sufficiently or known question perhaps for long term say a summer "Closed for the season" or pandimic year long shut down effect on the lamps and gear in general. Even LED fixtures might have problems in sitting for a year without cleaning before their next use.

The Philips "Optical" does not note dimming in voltage verses dimming for voltage chopping as the problem. It would be assumed dimmer chopping as more modern was not studied in presenting this as problem. Believe GE Spectrum catalogue (years ago) went best into the dimming problems on low voltage lamps and it was clearly before dimmer voltage chopping concept.

Also, I think modern low voltage dimmers or dimmable transformers might change that cited by Philips, GE and I believe Osram lamp concept on dimming of low voltage halogen lamps. Not to get into my 48 way incandescent and later resistor dummy load rack and various other versions of dummy loads which worked but were a work around.

Just something to keep in the back of your head as a potential problem or cause of perhaps. Sort of like why to keep a few DMX terminators in your tool bag even in these modern days. Yes about a month ago, a single terminator following hours of trying to troubleshoot a line of LED footlight products, instantly solved the problem. KISS or try the easy first... was not followed in wasting hours of time.
 

LesWilson

Well-Known Member
Lots of good information in this thread. My first thought when seeing your DIY rig was the Lowell Omni fixture from my filmmaking days would be a better/safer starting point for making what you want. They are a flexible system with various attach points and voltages available. Importantly, one of the accessories is a safety screen that clips on. That said, I can't speak to how the screen and available lamps would fullfil your shadowing requirements. But they are, perhaps, a safer starting point in the hands of a competent electrician. YMMV.
Lowel_O1_10_Omni_Light_500_Watt_Focus_1334681546_32175.jpg
 
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